Curriculum

We abide by the national curriculum which follows a set of standards and ensures all students study a wide range of subjects.

At Thistley Hough Academy our curriculum is rigorous and knowledge led, as such we build our curricula on the key knowledge that students need in order to master subject content. We do this by identifying the knowledge and skills that students are required to master in order to be successful at GCSE and tracking these back across the 5 years that students are with us.

In doing this we priorities depth of subject knowledge, enabling students to gain a broad understanding of each subject area. All pupils secure firm foundations in English and mathematics and this underpins excellence in other subject disciplines.

Regular assessments and interventions are structured to ensure that pupils are supported to build upon their strengths and overcome their challenges.

Our students study a broad range of subjects at Key Stages 3 and 4. Whilst we continually support our students through high-quality personal development and careers guidance programmes.

 

Y7, 8 & 9

  • All students get at least 7 hours a fortnight of mathematics
  • All students get at least 8 hours a fortnight of English
  • All students get at least 7 hours a fortnight of science

 

Y10 & 11

In years 10 and 11 we offer a full range of academic and vocational programmes with a particular emphasis on achievement at GCSE.

  • Most students in KS4 are following an academic GCSE based curriculum with the large majority having access to the English Baccalaureate.

 

  • Some students undertake 3 separate science GCSEs in biology, chemistry and physics and the rest are working towards the Combined Science Award.
  • Students chose geography or history in year 10 to give them sufficient time to achieve well at GCSE.
  • A free option allows students to opt for a full course in a wide range of subjects including RE, computer science, technology & art, amongst others.
  • All students in Y10 & 11 are working towards GCSE in both English Language and English Literature.
  • This curriculum is also designed to maximise the achievement of GCSE grades at 5+ including English and mathematics.
  • All students get 3 hours of physical education a fortnight

 

General

Personal, Social and Moral Education including citizenship is a strong theme across our curriculum.  Students learn about and discuss issues such as health, relationships, sex, life skills and their place in society.

The academy makes extensive use of ICT.  The academy has state of the art technology facilities and achieves very high standards in technology.

We have exciting and engaging extended schools and enrichment programmes.  These include extra-curricular classes, trips and visits and special events.  We provide residential and personal development experiences and opportunities for young people to participate in their local community and a comprehensive programme of after-school clubs and activities.  ‘Widening Horizons Days’ when the regular academy timetable is suspended, provide scope for extended project-based learning in real life contexts.

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OUR CURRICULUM

Year 7 Year 8 Year 9 Year 10 Year 11
Mathematics

Mathematics is a creative and highly inter-connected discipline that is essential to everyday life, critical to science, technology, and engineering, and necessary for financial literacy and most forms of employment. At Thistley Hough Academy, we provide a foundation for understanding the world, the ability to reason mathematically, an appreciation of the beauty and power of mathematics, and a sense of enjoyment and curiosity about the subject.

English

Students at Thistley Hough Academy study both English Language and Literature in following the AQA GCSE specifications.

The study of English Language prepares students to write analytically and in detail; develop critical reading skills; hone the skill of structuring a cohesive argument and become perceptive and sensitive communicators who are able to read and write with a high degree of technical accuracy.

English Literature develops students’ knowledge and skills in reading, writing and critical thinking.  It provides students with opportunities to read a range of texts in the genres of prose, poetry and drama.  Students are assessed on their ability to analyse and compare literary texts, explore ambiguity and read a range of different forms and genres by British writers.

Science

All students at Thistley Hough Academy study Biology, Chemistry and Physics in their Science lessons. As Science teachers, we aspire to fulfil our vision of “empowering students with the skills, curiosity and resilience for 21st Century life in our community.”

We strongly believe that the Science curriculum is more important than ever to develop young people for work in the near future, that will be defined by human interaction with technology and science.

We will achieve this through the use of both practical and theoretical lessons. The practical lessons will develop the pupil’s ability to explore the world around them, develop questions they may have about natural phenomena and design experiments to test their theories.

Theoretical lessons generally concentrate understanding on scientific concepts to underpin the practical lessons and the history of Scientific developments.

Art

The Art and Design Programme combines a conceptual framework with subject specific practical skills. As well as underpinning the teaching and learning of Art and Design, the Key Concepts, which drive the programme, explore the value and impact of Pattern, Structure, Meaning, Human Interaction, Performance and Practice.

Art and Design offers opportunities for students to develop their creativity, imagination and problem solving skills through visual, tactile and formal elements. Students develop techniques through experimenting with a wide range of media in response to the disciplines of Art, whilst developing practical, technical and critical skills, communicating their ideas, feelings and meanings in response to the work of artists and designers.

Computing

Students at Thistley Hough Academy study both Creative iMedia and GCSE Business in following the OCR GCSE specifications. The overall aim is to give learners a broad education that encourages creativity and equips them with the knowledge and skills to understand and change the world.

There are three district strands within computing, each of which is complementary to the other:

1. Computer Science (CS)
2. Information Technology (IT)
3. Digital Literacy (DL)

Computer Science is the scientific and practical study of computation: what can be computed, how to compute it, and how computation may be applied to the solution of problems. Information Technology is concerned with how computers and telecommunications equipment work, and how they may be applied to storage, retrieval, transmission and manipulation of data. Digital Literacy is the ability to effectively, responsibly, safely and critically navigate, evaluate and create digital artefacts using a range of digital technologies. The creation of digital artefacts will be integrated to much of the learning of computing. Digital artefacts can take many forms, including digital images, computer programs, spreadsheets, 3D animations and a digital booklet. At Thistley Hough Academy, we have designed a tailored computing curriculum to enable learners to successfully progress to a range of courses at College and University.

Our curriculum model provides learners with a solid foundation to pursue a wide range of career pathways:

– Software Developer, Database Administrator, Computer Hardware Engineer
– Computer Systems Analyst, Computer Networks Architect, Web Developer
– Information Security Analyst, Computer Research Scientist, Graphics Designer

Geography

At Thistley Hough Academy, our students will understand what it is to be a Geographer. Students will have a curiosity in finding out about the world and its people. They will have developed a passion and commitment to the subject. Our students will have developed an excellent knowledge of where places are and what they are like. They will have an understanding of the ways in which places are interdependent and interconnected, and how human and physical environments are interrelated. Pupils will develop an understanding of the issues facing a diverse range of places and people now and in the future, including how we can become more sustainable to help support our ever changing world.

Our pupils will have an extensive core of geographical knowledge and vocabulary, and will be able to communicate this, in a variety of ways, routinely. They will have good spatial awareness, and be able to use a wide range of maps effectively to investigate places. They will be able to carry out increasingly complex, independent geographical enquiry, ask their own relevant questions, make sense of geographical data, think critically about different views and justify their own view in reaching conclusions.

History

History at Thistley Hough Academy, encourages students to think critically about a wide variety of historical questions and to develop a broad range of historical knowledge.

In years 7, 8 and 9 students study a range of topics that will provide a solid background for GCSE study.

History plays a key role in developing our students into confident, successful adults. History requires students to develop an enquiring, critical mind especially in response to causation and consequence in regard to historical events. History as a discipline is highly regarded within the academic field and workplace.

Modern Foreign Languages

At Thistley Hough Academy, our aim is to equip all learners of MFL with a strong foundation across the four skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking. With a good understanding of the basic grammar and structures of the language, together with a secure basic vocabulary for dealing with a variety of known and unknown contexts, learners are able to move on to the next stage of language study with increasing confidence and proficiency. Through the study of foreign languages, we endeavour to embed cultural appreciation of the people and countries where French and Spanish are spoken. Our five year programme of study aims to maximise the progress and success of every student, irrespective of their starting point in foreign language learning.

Physical Education

The primary purpose of Physical Education at Thistley Hough Academy is to develop in young people an understanding of the positive impact an active lifestyle will have on their lives. The developmentally appropriate curriculum also provides a unique learning environment where affective, psychomotor and cognitive skills can be developed. In addition, good health practices, teamwork, sportsmanship, self-control, communication, resilience, and the opportunity for positive social interaction with peers are encouraged. Using leadership opportunities, students will be able to further build on these skills and characteristics as well as improving confidence. Research clearly shows that the active, healthy child is more likely to be academically motivated and establish habits of behaviour that will promote lives that are models of wellness.

Relgious Education

Religious Education at Thistley Hough Academy, encourages students to think critically about a wide variety of religious, ethical and philosophical questions.

RE plays a key role in developing our students into caring, confident, successful adults. This means not only striving for the highest standards of academic success for all our students and equipping them with the key skills for further learning and the world of work, but also providing them with the opportunities to formulate their own sets of values and beliefs about the world we live in.

Design Technology and Food Studies

In Design Technology, students have the chance to learn and explore a wealth of creative new skills. Learning is purposeful and relevant as students in all lessons see a direct link to industry, a career, and the influence of technology on our past, present and future. Students within DT use their creativity and imagination across a variety of disciplines to plan, design and make prototypes/dishes that solve real world problems. Students build their knowledge in many theoretical areas including contemporary technologies, materials and processes, design movements, nutrition and current world topics including sustainability and social responsibility.

We teach Design Technology as the practical strand of CET Knowledge Connected with the key concepts to the fore, whilst also fulfilling the requirements of the National Curriculum. The curriculum is taught across a range of material disciplines. These include, but are not limited to, Food and Nutrition, Timber based materials, Textiles, and Papers and Boards. The curriculum is modern, interesting and allows pupils to discover and develop their talents. It equips students with cutting edge knowledge, essential practical life skills and prepares them with an abundance of transferable skills that are desirable for further study and prospective careers.

The vision for learners in Design Technology is to progress from Year 7 to Year 9 as independent, collaborative and competent students that can analyse, problem solve, design, reflect, apply, make, evaluate and, have an in-depth understanding of the theoretical topics relating to Design and Technology.

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Mastery Achievables

Number:

Through this unit, students will consolidate and master key number skills of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division using a range of methods such as partitioning and estimation in order to allow students the necessary skills to progress to future units of work such as fractions, decimals and percentages and to be able to access AO3 questions at GCSE. Students will learn to follow the order of operations for all calculations. Students will carry out all operations using both positive and negative numbers and apply these skills to money and time. They will be able to identify factors, multiples, primes and square numbers plus its roots. This will lead to students being able to calculate the highest common factor and lowest common multiple of two or more numbers.

Analysing and displaying data:

Through this unit, students will calculate mode, median and range from lists of data and mode and range from a frequency table. Students will develop a range of ways to display data, this will include consolidation of interpreting and drawing bar charts before progressing to dual bar charts (comparative and compound bar charts) and line graphs. Students will learn how to collect data using a frequency table, which will support further statistical diagrams in future years such as pie charts and histograms. Students will use averages (mode, median and mean) and range to begin to compare data, this will support further students understanding of box plots and cumulative frequency graphs at GCSE.

Expressions, Functions and Formulae:

Through this unit of work, students will develop an understanding of using function machines to identify functions, variables and begin to solve number sentences given an input or output. Students will discover facts and rules for simplifying expressions, writing expressions and formulae to represent mathematical problems, leading to substitution of given values and expanding single brackets.

Decimals and measures:

Through this unit, students will develop an understanding of size, in relation to length, mass and capacity, students will discover rounding to decimal places and how to use this to estimate calculations. Students will need to accurately measure and draw lines and accurately read and interpret scales using a range of units of measure. Students will further develop strategies for calculating with decimals using all four operations, this will lead students to develop the skills to calculate perimeter and area of shapes made from rectangles and squares and compound shapes made from squares and rectangles. This will allow students to develop the necessary skills to begin constructing angles and triangles in unit 8.

Lines and angles:

Through this unit, students will discover different angle facts and how these relate to properties of 2D shapes. Students will develop an understanding of the properties of simple 2D shapes. Students will learn how to draw and measure angles with precision, leading towards the construction of triangles.

Mastery Achievables

Sequences and graphs:

Through this unit, students will discover the term to term rule of a number or pictorial sequence. Students will understand the difference between infinite and finite. Students will discover different types of sequences including Fibonacci, geometric and arithmetic. Students will develop these skills further by discovering position to term rules (nth term) and using the nth term to form a given sequence. Students will plot coordinates in the four quadrants and calculate the midpoint of a line segment. This will allow students to draw straight line graphs from equations such as y = 3x, using their knowledge of function machines from the unit ‘Expressions, functions and formulae’.

Fractions and percentages:

Through this unit, students will discover unit fractions in order to determine size and compare fractions. Students need to be confident simplifying and finding equivalent fractions with common denominators and calculating fractions with common denominators. Students need to apply skills from the previous unit ‘Number’ to find fractions of amounts and to convert between fractions and decimals and mixed numbers and improper fractions. Students need to develop an understanding of percentages and how they link to fractions and decimals, allowing them to calculate percentages of amounts using non-calculator methods and discovering decimal multipliers in order to calculate more difficult percentages of amounts.

Transformations:

Through this unit, students will discover the concept of congruency, and transformations, including translation, rotation, reflection and enlargement. Students will need these skills to identify line, rotational and planes of symmetry in 2D and 3D shapes. Students need to be able to combine transformation and describe using a single transformation.

Mastery Achievables

Ratio and proportion:

Through this unit, students will discover the unitary method to solve simple direct proportion questions. Students will know that ratio compares a part to another part; they will simplify ratio using knowledge from the previous unit ‘Number’. Students will develop an understanding of sharing a quantity into a given ratio and how to use ratio to convert between metric units of measure. Students will need to link their knowledge of fractions and percentages to compare proportions.

Probability:

Through this unit, students will discover the language of probability using the probability scale to calculate the likelihood of an event happening or not happening. Students will discover the difference between theoretical probability (i.e. what should happen) and experimental probability (the results of an experiment). Students will understand that reliability of results is determined by the number of trials completed (i.e. the greater the number of trials the more accurate the results).

Mastery Achievables

LITERATURE: Full prose text considering the theme of identity.  Text studied ‘Wonder’ or ‘Face’.

Students to share the experience of reading a modern novel which encourages human empathy and provokes thought about how we can contribute to a truly inclusive society.  As well as the teaching of explicit English Literature skills such as analysing the themes and the style of an innovative/engaging literary work.

It is vital that the range of texts from different historical and social backgrounds that students experience includes the opportunity for them to read literature which encourages them to challenge existing stereotypes in the world in which they live and to formulate their own opinions about what represents tolerance and inclusivity in society.  Engaging, contemporary literature therefore provides students with a pathway for personal growth.

Through the reading of an acclaimed modern novels such as ‘Face’ or ‘Wonder’, students are able to share the experience of reading a modern novel which encourages human empathy and provokes thought about how we can contribute to a truly inclusive society.  Themes such as individuality and social responsibility underpin this literary journey.  Positive role modelling enhances the moral scope of the novel, enabling students to learn how to become responsible citizens.  Analysis of the concept of precepts as guiding principles in life fuels interesting discussion about what we value and how we would like to conduct our lives.

This unit seeks to develop students’ skills from those at KS2.  It allows the teaching of explicit English Literature skills such as analysing the universal themes of identity and personal change. Characterisation is very relatable to students since the main character is a typical teenage boy who undergoes a crisis of identity making the text extremely engaging.

LANGUAGE: Creative writing and fiction reading

This unit seeks to develop students’ factual and analytical responses to creative texts from those demonstrated at KS2.   It is taught explicitly  and complements the English Literature course provision.  This is a proven, successful method for encouraging students to transfer their ability to analyse language used in creative texts, as extracts from English Language Paper 1 are almost exclusively drawn from literary works.

Moreover, as students progress through Key Stage 3, they will be required to study the craft of the writer for both their English Language and English Literature courses as well as learning how to develop their own creative writing through their appreciation of a wide range of literary/creative texts.

Mastery Achievables

LITERATURE: C19th Prose.  Gothic Horror and poetry

It is a necessity that all students are adept at analysing a range of texts from different historical and social contexts. This will include: the writers’ use of language and devices; the writers’ intentions and structural devices for effect. Through the analysis of genre, students will also identify devices which typify the writing style, utilising these devices in their own writing development.

The gothic genre remains one of the most popular, since its early development with the likes of Shelley and Bram Stoker. Modern tests, such as ‘Twilight’, further captivate modern readers, especially the teenage audience. Through captivating texts, students will develop their analysis, identifying themes of blood, death and horror.

This unit seeks to develop students’ skills from those at KS2. The narrative structure, use of suspense and climax and pathetic fallacy can also be utilised by students to enhance their own writing, meeting purpose, form and audience.

At GCSE, students will study ‘A Christmas Carol’. Many features of the gothic genre are typified in this ‘Christmas Ghost Story’. Furthermore, within Language Paper 2, students are required to study and compare pre and post 20th Century texts.  This unit, develops decoding skills to enable students to access the complex language in these texts.

Finally, within further and wider education, students will require the skills: intertextual referencing; supporting arguments with evidence and writing with style and structure.

LANGUAGE: Transactional writing and non-fiction reading

Students will read a range of non-fiction extracts, these will continue with the theme of gothic horror.  Students will also develop their understanding and ability to analyse how writers use various methods of creating meaning.  They will also consider why and how an author might make language choices and how they convey their ideas throughout a text.

They will also have considered the features of writing to argue and persuade by learning how to write a newspaper article.

Mastery Achievables

LITERATURE: Introduction to Shakespeare and ‘Romeo and Juliet’.

It is inestimably important that students have access to the works of Shakespeare at the earliest opportunity as well as beginning to analyse a range of texts with varying historical and social context. In this unit, pupils will have the opportunity to analyse themes and ideas using two different formats by the same writer: poetry and a play script.

Shakespeare remains to this day, possibly the most important writer that Great Britain has produced and his inclusion on the English Literature examination for every pupil in the country to study is a clear signal of how important his works are to this day.

At the end of KS2, pupils have been given the opportunity to read more widely on a range of texts which will have prepared them well for moving into the more nuanced language that Shakespeare used.  Pupils will have the opportunity to read a part of Romeo and Juliet and also look at how Shakespeare used verse in his plays. Romeo and Juliet has been chosen for study as the themes of love and of two warring families are very accessible and something which pupils at the chosen age are able to understand.  The story is one of Shakespeare’s most famous and due to various adaptations for young children, it is likely that many pupils will have some familiarity.  The sonnets chosen for study also link to the theme of romance which will allow pupils to apply their knowledge of the themes to these.

Students will be given an introduction to the life and times of William Shakespeare, the historical context of his works and the theatre.  Pupils will complete a reading of the first two scenes of “Romeo and Juliet” that will allow pupils to demonstrate their understanding of Shakespeare’s language and how his plays had been crafted for his audience.  Pupils will have to answer a question based on one of Shakespeare’s plays for their GCSE exam which will make up 20% of their final GCSE grade. To do this, they will need to be able to use their knowledge of the play, be able to interpret and comment on the use of language and demonstrate an understanding of the main themes and context of the play.  This unit of study will allow pupils to familiarise themselves with the era in which Shakespeare was writing, what influenced him to write the plays and an understanding of the audience that he was writing for.

LANGUAGE: Speaking and Listening

To become confident and self-assured individuals students need to develop their ability to speak publicly and listen, with respect, to the views of others.  Through groupwork, debates and speech writing students will be assessed on their ability to construct and argument, which they are able to defend in front of their peers.

Mastery Achievables

Biology: Organisms

Students will begin their study on cells, the building blocks of all life, by looking at the differences between animal and plants cells as well as certain specialised cells. In addition, the pupils will also study the human body on a larger scale by looking at the skeletal and muscular systems.

Chemistry: Matter

Students will begin their study on how particles make up all of matter. They will look at how the energy of these particles determine the state of the matter through their work on solids, liquids and gasses. Students will then move on to study solutions and how to separate mixtures.

Physics: Energy

Students will begin their studies in Physics by looking at the concept of energy. Students will study food as sources of energy as well as other sources of energy. They will then study energy transfers and look at how the efficiency of a transfer may be calculated.

Mastery Achievables

Biology: Eco-Systems

Students will study how organisms rely in each other through the use of food chains and webs and how organisms compete for resources. They will also study how plants reproduce through the use of pollination, seed dispersal and germination.

Chemistry: Reactions

Students will study the chemical reactions between acids and alkalis and learn how to recognise these chemicals through the use of indicators. In the second half of the unit students will learn about chemical reactions involving metals and acids, oxygen or water.

Physics: Waves

Students will study sound and light in detail. With regards to sound, students will look at sound waves and the speed that they travel. Students will be able to describe sound waves in terms of pitch and loudness and link this to the sound wave. They will also study the structure of the ear and how it detects sound waves. As part of the study of light, students will study reflections and refractions as well as how light is detected in the eye.

Mastery Achievables

Biology: Genes

Students will study variation between organisms and how animals and plants adapt to change in the first part of this module. In the second part of the module they will study adolescence in humans, alongside human reproductive systems and foetal development.

Chemistry: Earth

In this unit students will study both the structure of the Earth as well as the night sky and space. Firstly, they will study different rock types and their uses, before moving onto looking at our planets place with the solar system.

Physics: Forces

Initially, students will start by looking at balanced and unbalanced force, and what effect this has on the movement of an object. This will include the study and calculation of speed and using distance time graphs. They will finish the topic by studying gravity and its effects.

Mastery Achievables

Tonal theory, mark making and perspective.

Observational pencil drawing.

Mark making exploring line, tone and texture with a wide range of materials.

Mastery Achievables

Colour theory and the fundamentals of the colour wheel.

Mixing and blending using paint.

Developing contextual and cultural connections through the introduction of art movements and artists.

Mastery Achievables

Exploring pattern, colour, texture, line and shapes in non-Western Art and print.

2D in to a 3D structure.

Understanding surface decoration and connecting surfaces and planes together.

Mastery Achievables

Core Course Topics:

  • Using technologies safely and responsibly
  • Basic Skills
  • Introduction to MS Teams

Students will be able to protect their personal information online, identify potential online threats and dangers, understand how and who to report to when at risk online, identify the purpose and uses of ICT equipment, use MS Teams to access student and teacher resources, and confidently use integrated Microsoft packages, confidently navigate MS Teams and features, access, send and receive emails appropriately and Boolean search techniques to locate online sources.

Students will learn how to use the school systems according to the AUP, create a secure and memorable password, create and organise files/folders on the school network/Cloud server, how the internet and social media can be used for positive self-promotion, how people can curate and experiment with their identity online and why they might wish to do this. Be aware personal online activity, history or profile will affect the type of information returned in a search or on a social media stream, and intended to influence beliefs, actions and choices, how and why people who they communicate with online may try to influence others negatively, strategies for assessing the degree of trust placed in people or organisations online, the initial signs of potentially problematic situations e.g. grooming, cyberbullying, when they need to take action and explain what to do if they are concerned about an online relationship, engage with others using MS Teams and email and seek and submit work using MS Teams

Students will be able to assess the benefits and the potential risks of sharing information online, describe what is appropriate to say and do in different online settings/ platforms (e.g. opinions, values, information, shares, ‘likes’, ‘forwards’), describe a range of different bullying types and behaviours and assess when these are occurring (e.g. homophobic, racist, gender, exclusion), identify and demonstrate actions to support others who are experiencing difficulties online, identify a target audience, select the tools in: A word processor; Presentation software; Desktop publisher and to produce a document appropriate for a target audience.

Mastery Achievables

Core Course Topics:

  • Spreadsheets
  • Understanding Computers & Networks
  • Programming Essentials

Students have the opportunity to study this practical, skills-based unit covering the principles of creating and formatting basic spreadsheets to produce and use simple computer models. It further develops students who have a basic knowledge of spreadsheets including cell references, simple formulae and formatting, although these topics are revised in the first instance, making it also suitable for students new to spreadsheets. The unit is centred around creating a financial model for a TV show. Pupils start by looking at different types of model and then use basic spreadsheet techniques to create and format a simple financial model to calculate the expected income from a business model. The model is then extended to include sales from merchandising, with the introduction of “what if” scenarios. Finally, the students create a seating plan, book seats and calculate income from seat sales. Spreadsheet features covered include SUM, MAX, IF and COUNTIF functions, cell naming for absolute referencing, conditional formatting, validation, charting and simple macros. Microsoft Excel software is used to provide students with an hands on opportunity to use spreadsheet software.

Students will learn how to identify network components, to identify internet connection methods, understand the difference between Internet and WWW and understand how the world is connected Identify components of a computer.

Students will be taught that hardware includes the physical components of the computer, software includes the computer programs that run on the hardware, computers function as input, process and output systems, data is input, computation is performed, and an output response is given, Computers are often connected through networks, a network is one or more computers connected via a router or switch, The internet is a network of networks and connected computers have numeric IP (Internet Protocol) addresses, which are used to identify where to send data items and where they have come from.

Mastery Achievables

Core Course Topics:

  • Understanding Computers & Networks
  • Programming Essentials

This is a theoretical unit covering the basic principles of computer architecture and use of binary. Students will revise some of the theory on input and output covered in previous learning and continue to look at the Input-Process-Output sequence and the Fetch-Decode-Execute cycle through practical activities. Students will then look at some simple binary to decimal conversion and vice versa, and learn how text characters are represented using the ASCII code. This will be followed by some simple binary addition. Students will learn more in depth how storage devices represent data using binary patterns and physically save these patterns. Finally, they will look at a brief history of communication devices, how new technologies and applications are emerging and the pace of change.

Students will have the opportunity to design, use, and evaluate computational abstractions that model the state and behaviour of real-world problems and physical systems, Use two or more programming languages, one of which is textual, to solve a variety of computational problems; make appropriate use of data structures such as lists, tables or arrays; design and develop modular programs that use procedures or functions, understand simple Boolean logic (such as AND, OR and NOT), and some of its uses in circuits and programming

In the final unit students will be introduced to the Scratch programming environment and begin by reverse-engineering some existing games. They will then progress to planning and developing their own games, learning to incorporate variables, procedures (using the Broadcast function), lists and operators. They should be able to create a fully working game with lives, scoring and some randomisation of objects. Finally they will learn to test and debug their programs.

Students will understand that Understand the hardware and software components that make up computer systems, and how they communicate with one another and with other systems, understand how instructions are stored and executed within a computer system; understand how data of various types (including text, sounds, and pictures) can be represented and manipulated digitally, in the form of binary digits; be able to convert between binary and decimal, and perform simple binary arithmetic.

Mastery Achievables

What makes a good Geographer?

Students will begin their study of Geography by being introduced to the three aspects of geography: human, physical and environmental geography. Within this unit, they will explore the location and names of the world’s oceans and continents and learn how to locate places within the world using both compass directions and latitudinal and longitudinal co-ordinates. Students will also be introduced to Ordnance Survey maps, exploring how to identify key features using OS map symbols and how to locate places within the UK using four and six figure grid references and describe their location using contour lines and compass directions.

What are settlements and how do they link to the economy?

Students will continue their journey by being able to distinguish between the UK, Great Britain and the British Isles and their respective countries. They will explore UK settlement types and patterns. Further to this, they will be able to identify the different economic sectors and activities associated with these and describe how both key examples of the secondary and tertiary sectors have helped shape Stoke-On-Trent’s economy and how this links to the city’s urbanisation over time. Whilst exploring the tertiary sector students will investigate a TNC and its operations local to Stoke-On-Trent, and by the end of the unit student’s will understand different sustainable strategies used by organisations within the tertiary sector.

Mastery Achievables

Is Earth running out of natural resources?

Students will be able to identify and describe the key features of the Earth’s spheres, identify key rock and soil types and be able to explain the formation of the key rock types. Key math skills will be developed, along with students being able to articulate the importance of clay and coal to the city of Stoke-On-Trent’s development and economy, whilst understanding how coal enabled the UK to develop. In addition to this students will be able to tell the difference between non-renewable and renewable resources, and the importance of non-renewable resources to the world and the influence the Middle East plays as being the largest global producer and exporter of oil. Finally, they will be able to classify which sphere different resources belong to and evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of different natural resources, and begin to understand the importance of renewable energies being used in everyday life.

What is Weather and Climate?

Pupils will be able to distinguish between weather and climate, understand why it rains in the UK and why its weather is so variable. They will know what type of climate the UK has and how to interpret climate graphs for key cities within the UK. They will also conduct a micro-climate enquiry, whereby they will develop their abilities to make geographical decisions, ask geographical questions, record and use geographical data to analyse their results and make conclusions to a geographical hypothesis.

Mastery Achievables

What are the opportunities and challenges facing Africa?

During this unit students will develop their sense of place and locational knowledge of Africa, whilst being able to locate and describe the distribution of its key biomes including deserts and tropical rainforests. They will begin to understand how developed parts of Africa are and how urbanisation has shaped key countries within the continent. Further to this, they will explore the key challenges of Desertification, Climate Change and Piracy facing key countries and the continent collectively; whilst exploring the opportunities that key countries and the continent have implemented to overcome these.

Mastery Achievables

Norman Conquest

This area of study allows students to make a natural transition chronologically from their studies at KS2 to KS3, with most primaries studying Anglo Saxon England. The module also allows students to recognise that Norman England was an important period in the story of migration to Britain, to recognise that England was successfully invaded by a foreign force; this invasion brought about many of the institutions and cultural markers which England, now as the UK has in place today. This provides the opportunity to study historical concepts such as change and continuity and interpretation.

The Norman Conquest is a very significant marker in the history of England, being the point at which the largely uninterrupted system of monarchy and other power bases began in their present form. Cultural shifts such as language, our affinity with France and architecture can all be sourced from this time period too, with many historians arguing that the Norman Conquest saw the biggest change in our nation’s history. In addition to English History, it also allows students to understand the background to Medieval Europe, including the Hundred Years War.

Throughout this and future modules, students will be looking at the key concepts of:

 

  • Class, peoples’ opportunities have been dictated by their socio-economic standing and have defined relationships in society
  • Authority, the acceptance of the source of authority, and the relationship between ruler and ruled
  • Religion and beliefs of societies, and the impact on communities
  • Migration and population shift over time
Mastery Achievables

Power in Medieval England

This area of study allows students to continue chronologically from the Norman conquest in term 1. The unit allows students to recognise and understand the political issues that occurred during the Medieval period. Many of the events brought about changes to social structures and the rule of law that can still be seen in the UK today.

This period of history saw tumultuous events that created problems for the ruling elite such as Magna Carta and the Peasants revolt. Both events saw the ruling elite having to change because rebellion by different classes of people. Events from this time are still pertinent today. Magna Carta is still in part, enshrined in English law. The period will see the Church and the ruling elite battle on who should control the moral and spiritual teaching of the population. Through further units in future years, students will identify further incidents where church, nobility, people and monarchy come into conflict such as the English reformation and the English Civil War. Finally, this unit will see England’s relationship with Wales, Scotland and Ireland. The conquests under Edward I will allow students to understand the relationship between the home nations and how it will eventually become the United Kingdom.

Medieval Towns

This unit of work will give the students the opportunity to discover how towns changed during the Medieval Period. Students will be asked to think about their modern experiences socially and compare them to the Medieval Period where people’s views on public health, religion and law and order.

The unit of work is important to students as they will understand the problems faced by the burgeoning towns across the country and the problems faced in public health when dealing will sanitation and disease. Beside the backdrop of the Black Death, students will understand the problems faced by the authorities in tackling the plague and relate to modern experiences. Students will also understand the importance that religion played in shaping people’s views actions in everyday life and towards combatting the disease.

Mastery Achievables

The Crusades

This unit of work will give students the opportunity to understand the complexity surrounding the religious crusades that lasted for 300 years and still has an impact on the Middle East politically. Students will be asked to think about the reasons for crusades and will analyse interpretations in order to assess the impact of the crusades on social and political systems.

The unit of work is important as it gives students an understanding of why people went on crusades and will link their knowledge to previous units on religious beliefs. They will be able to understand the details of the main crusades and the multitude of reasons why people went to fight. The Crusades also saw a coming together of two cultures. New products found their way to Northern Europe as well as new learning and the rediscovery of Greek learning. Many of the new learning from Muslim scholars allowed the Renaissance and exploration in the New World to happen.

The Tudors

This unit of work will give students the opportunity to understand the major changes that occurred under the Tudor Period. England went through a period of great change in terms of religion and the power of the monarch. Students will be asked to think about the economic, religious and social impact that the various Tudor monarchs brought about.

The importance of this unit is clear as the changes brought about by Henry VIII caused problems for the future monarchs and sewed the seeds for the future English Civil War which will be studied in Year 8. The religious changes brought about by the reformation caused mass upheaval and rebellion by people who were asked to change their way of belief and worship. Students will also understand the complexities and difficulties of Elizabeth I’s reign and how she reacted to threats internally and externally. The legacy of the Tudor period has a lasting impact. Their actions dictated our future direction in gaining an Empire starting with the new colonies in the Americas. The change in religion still has a resonance today with our current Queen titled ‘Defender of the Faith’, a title given by Henry VIII.

Mastery Achievables

Students begin their language journey with greetings and introductions, numbers and dates, telling the time and giving opinions on their different school subjects.

Mastery Achievables

In the second term, students learn how to describe the weather and what to wear in different types of weather. They go on to express their likes and dislikes about various sports and free time activities.

Mastery Achievables

In the summer term, students introduce and describe family members and pets, talk about their local area, meal times and eating out.

Mastery Achievables

Invasion Games

To develop knowledge and understanding of basic skills by recognising and demonstrating, techniques (accuracy and consistency), rules and regulations (as set out by the respective NGB) of all activities.

Develop performance of the basic skills of passing, shooting, footwork, turning, dribbling and ball control.

Develop knowledge and understanding of basic tactics and positional play and identify opportunities to demonstrate these within a game.

Gymnastics

To use creativity to develop/choreograph routines and sequences whilst demonstrating an understanding of aesthetics in performance.

To develop sequences based on travel using different parts of the body, level and speed working both independently and in groups.

Mastery Achievables

Netball

To develop knowledge and understanding of basic skills by recognising and demonstrating, techniques (accuracy and consistency), rules and regulations (as set out by the respective NGB) of all activities.

Develop performance of the basic skills of serving, forehand and backhand.

Develop knowledge and understanding of basic tactics and positional play and identify opportunities to demonstrate these within a game.

Health-related Fitness

To develop knowledge and understanding of the components of fitness by describing – aerobic endurance, speed, strength, muscular endurance, agility, co-ordination, flexibility.

Develop knowledge and understanding on how to prepare for physical activity – identify the key stages of a warm-up, cool down, stretches; demonstrate and describe the purpose of each.

Develop knowledge and understanding by describing the long and short-term effects of exercise on the body.

Mastery Achievables

Striking and Fielding

To develop knowledge and understanding of basic skills by recognising and demonstrating, techniques (accuracy and consistency), rules and regulations (as set out by the respective NBG) of all activities.

Develop performance of the basic skills of fielding, throwing, catching, batting and bowling.

Develop knowledge and understanding of basic tactics and positional play (fielding and directional hitting) and identify opportunities to demonstrate these within a game.

Athletics

To develop knowledge and understanding by recognising and demonstrating the basic techniques (accuracy and consistency), rules and regulations (as set out by the respective NGB) of all athletics events.

Develop performance of the basic techniques in sprinting, long-distance running, throwing and jumping events.

Develop knowledge and understanding of the factors that affect performance in these events and be able to describe these.

Mastery Achievables

World religions.

The world religion topic that we start with gives students the basics for each of the 6 world religions that we have selected for this half term. Additionally, this allows students to judge their own beliefs and considerer questions that they won’t have before. Students come to us at THA having a mixed range of Religious studies knowledge. This module allows students who have not done RE before get the basics while also extending the thinking of students who have done RE before in KS2.

Mastery Achievables

First half term – Festivals and celebrations.

The Religious festivals topic aims to show students how beliefs influence and impact real life. Students will use the skills and knowledge from HT1 to form opinions and see the deeper meaning behind some religious festivals for some different world religions. Students will encounter different religious festivals throughout their lives and will be able to understand the origins and influence of these.

Second half term – Good and evil.

At this point in the curriculum we introduce a module which starts to shift the focus from factual thinking to wider ideas that link to today’s world. The topic of good and evil looks at the key foundations behind religious thinking, students are posed ‘big questions’ which will structure this module and allow students to question ideas and principles within society. It is imperative that we teach this to build students ability to approach big questions in a confident manner and also to show students how to methodically approach a questions based on an abstract concept with different causes and effects.

Mastery Achievables

First half term – How do we live our lives?

This introduces wider ranging questions and has a practical focus whilst working to build students skill of evaluation in regards to RE. The reason for this topic is to allow to students to comprehend bigger ideas and to break down the stereotype that RE isn’t just limited to certain groups of people who may seem to have nothing in common with the students in the classroom. Students will use these skills both within and outside of school and be able to account for the beliefs and actions of certain individuals and groups whilst also understanding their own.

Second half term – Rebels and religion.

We will discover the influence of religion on individuals through the use of case studies and real life scenarios so that students can evaluate the motives and influence behind actions. While we are looking at various different case studies we will also focus on the actions of the man who some say was the biggest rebel of all, Jesus. At this point in the curriculum we introduce a module which starts to shift the focus from factual thinking to wider ideas that link to today’s world.

Mastery Achievables

Timbers

Students are introduced to a range of timber working tools and equipment to produce a wood object in response to a given brief or set of instructions. Introduction to health and safety in the workshop.

Students will learn a technical drawing skill of either isometric or orthographic drawing used to make a working drawing.

Students will use and understand appropriate use of a coping saw and a Tenon saw. Skills using a pillar drill and screwdriver. Understanding of different finishes include use of sand paper, the sanding machine and stain/paint/dye etc.

Students will gain knowledge of wood joints and their appropriate uses. The origins of Timber and difference between hardwoods and softwoods.

Students will learn about product analysis of an existing product. And will be able to evaluate focussed on functional testing.

Papers and Boards

Students will be Introduced to a range of paper and board materials through projects with both 2D and 3D outcomes. Introduction to aesthetics, colour and layout.

Students will design a range of ideas based on a brief and develop ideas using feedback from others.

Students will Work with paper and boards. Understanding of different adhesives for paper and board and appropriate application of colour and design.

Students will start to understand the different types of paper and boards and their uses, nets, 2D to 3D structures and cutting methods using paper and board. They will also be introduced to colour theory.

Students will learn how to analysis existing design work or the work of others.

Mastery Achievables

Nutrition and Healthy Eating

Students are introduced to a range of ingredients and cooking methods through following set instructions and recipes. Introduction to nutrition and healthy eating.

Students will learn to adapt and refine a simple dish to make it healthier and/or more appealing.

Students will use a variety of ingredients. Learn the claw grip and bridge grip cutting methods. Use an oven and a hob to cook food. Understand key cooking methods such as frying, baking, beating and creaming.

Students will understand what a healthy balanced diet looks like by following the guidance of the Eatwell Guide.

Students will start to understand how to analyse and evaluate through the use of sensory analysis to explore key terms of flavour and consistency.

Students will be able to evaluate the effectiveness of a series of practical outcomes using a sensory analysis.

Mastery Achievables
Mathematics

Mathematics is a creative and highly inter-connected discipline that is essential to everyday life, critical to science, technology, and engineering, and necessary for financial literacy and most forms of employment. At Thistley Hough Academy, we provide a foundation for understanding the world, the ability to reason mathematically, an appreciation of the beauty and power of mathematics, and a sense of enjoyment and curiosity about the subject.

English

Students at Thistley Hough Academy study both English Language and Literature in following the AQA GCSE specifications.

The study of English Language prepares students to write analytically and in detail; develop critical reading skills; hone the skill of structuring a cohesive argument and become perceptive and sensitive communicators who are able to read and write with a high degree of technical accuracy.

English Literature develops students’ knowledge and skills in reading, writing and critical thinking.  It provides students with opportunities to read a range of texts in the genres of prose, poetry and drama.  Students are assessed on their ability to analyse and compare literary texts, explore ambiguity and read a range of different forms and genres by British writers.

Science

All students at Thistley Hough Academy study Biology, Chemistry and Physics in their Science lessons. As Science teachers, we aspire to fulfil our vision of “empowering students with the skills, curiosity and resilience for 21st Century life in our community.”

We strongly believe that the Science curriculum is more important than ever to develop young people for work in the near future, that will be defined by human interaction with technology and science.

We will achieve this through the use of both practical and theoretical lessons. The practical lessons will develop the pupil’s ability to explore the world around them, develop questions they may have about natural phenomena and design experiments to test their theories.

Theoretical lessons generally concentrate understanding on scientific concepts to underpin the practical lessons and the history of Scientific developments.

Art

The Art and Design Programme combines a conceptual framework with subject specific practical skills. As well as underpinning the teaching and learning of Art and Design, the Key Concepts, which drive the programme, explore the value and impact of Pattern, Structure, Meaning, Human Interaction, Performance and Practice.

Art and Design offers opportunities for students to develop their creativity, imagination and problem solving skills through visual, tactile and formal elements. Students develop techniques through experimenting with a wide range of media in response to the disciplines of Art, whilst developing practical, technical and critical skills, communicating their ideas, feelings and meanings in response to the work of artists and designers.

Computing

Students at Thistley Hough Academy study both Creative iMedia and GCSE Business in following the OCR GCSE specifications. The overall aim is to give learners a broad education that encourages creativity and equips them with the knowledge and skills to understand and change the world.

There are three district strands within computing, each of which is complementary to the other:

1. Computer Science (CS)
2. Information Technology (IT)
3. Digital Literacy (DL)

Computer Science is the scientific and practical study of computation: what can be computed, how to compute it, and how computation may be applied to the solution of problems. Information Technology is concerned with how computers and telecommunications equipment work, and how they may be applied to storage, retrieval, transmission and manipulation of data. Digital Literacy is the ability to effectively, responsibly, safely and critically navigate, evaluate and create digital artefacts using a range of digital technologies. The creation of digital artefacts will be integrated to much of the learning of computing. Digital artefacts can take many forms, including digital images, computer programs, spreadsheets, 3D animations and a digital booklet. At Thistley Hough Academy, we have designed a tailored computing curriculum to enable learners to successfully progress to a range of courses at College and University.

Our curriculum model provides learners with a solid foundation to pursue a wide range of career pathways:

– Software Developer, Database Administrator, Computer Hardware Engineer
– Computer Systems Analyst, Computer Networks Architect, Web Developer
– Information Security Analyst, Computer Research Scientist, Graphics Designer

Geography

At Thistley Hough Academy, our students will understand what it is to be a Geographer. Students will have a curiosity in finding out about the world and its people. They will have developed a passion and commitment to the subject. Our students will have developed an excellent knowledge of where places are and what they are like. They will have an understanding of the ways in which places are interdependent and interconnected, and how human and physical environments are interrelated. Pupils will develop an understanding of the issues facing a diverse range of places and people now and in the future, including how we can become more sustainable to help support our ever changing world.

Our pupils will have an extensive core of geographical knowledge and vocabulary, and will be able to communicate this, in a variety of ways, routinely. They will have good spatial awareness, and be able to use a wide range of maps effectively to investigate places. They will be able to carry out increasingly complex, independent geographical enquiry, ask their own relevant questions, make sense of geographical data, think critically about different views and justify their own view in reaching conclusions.

History

History at Thistley Hough Academy, encourages students to think critically about a wide variety of historical questions and to develop a broad range of historical knowledge.

In years 7, 8 and 9 students study a range of topics that will provide a solid background for GCSE study.

History plays a key role in developing our students into confident, successful adults. History requires students to develop an enquiring, critical mind especially in response to causation and consequence in regard to historical events. History as a discipline is highly regarded within the academic field and workplace.

Modern Foreign Languages

At Thistley Hough Academy, our aim is to equip all learners of MFL with a strong foundation across the four skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking. With a good understanding of the basic grammar and structures of the language, together with a secure basic vocabulary for dealing with a variety of known and unknown contexts, learners are able to move on to the next stage of language study with increasing confidence and proficiency. Through the study of foreign languages, we endeavour to embed cultural appreciation of the people and countries where French and Spanish are spoken. Our five year programme of study aims to maximise the progress and success of every student, irrespective of their starting point in foreign language learning.

Physical Education

The primary purpose of Physical Education at Thistley Hough Academy is to develop in young people an understanding of the positive impact an active lifestyle will have on their lives. The developmentally appropriate curriculum also provides a unique learning environment where affective, psychomotor and cognitive skills can be developed. In addition, good health practices, teamwork, sportsmanship, self-control, communication, resilience, and the opportunity for positive social interaction with peers are encouraged. Using leadership opportunities, students will be able to further build on these skills and characteristics as well as improving confidence. Research clearly shows that the active, healthy child is more likely to be academically motivated and establish habits of behaviour that will promote lives that are models of wellness.

Relgious Education

Religious Education at Thistley Hough Academy, encourages students to think critically about a wide variety of religious, ethical and philosophical questions.

RE plays a key role in developing our students into caring, confident, successful adults. This means not only striving for the highest standards of academic success for all our students and equipping them with the key skills for further learning and the world of work, but also providing them with the opportunities to formulate their own sets of values and beliefs about the world we live in.

Design Technology and Food Studies

In Design Technology, students have the chance to learn and explore a wealth of creative new skills. Learning is purposeful and relevant as students in all lessons see a direct link to industry, a career, and the influence of technology on our past, present and future. Students within DT use their creativity and imagination across a variety of disciplines to plan, design and make prototypes/dishes that solve real world problems. Students build their knowledge in many theoretical areas including contemporary technologies, materials and processes, design movements, nutrition and current world topics including sustainability and social responsibility.

We teach Design Technology as the practical strand of CET Knowledge Connected with the key concepts to the fore, whilst also fulfilling the requirements of the National Curriculum. The curriculum is taught across a range of material disciplines. These include, but are not limited to, Food and Nutrition, Timber based materials, Textiles, and Papers and Boards. The curriculum is modern, interesting and allows pupils to discover and develop their talents. It equips students with cutting edge knowledge, essential practical life skills and prepares them with an abundance of transferable skills that are desirable for further study and prospective careers.

The vision for learners in Design Technology is to progress from Year 7 to Year 9 as independent, collaborative and competent students that can analyse, problem solve, design, reflect, apply, make, evaluate and, have an in-depth understanding of the theoretical topics relating to Design and Technology.

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Mastery Achievables

Calculating with fractions

Through this unit of work, students will use their knowledge of equivalent fractions to compare and order fractions with different denominators, begin to calculate with fractions of different denominators and mixed numbers. Students will need these skills for future units of work such as calculating percentages of amounts, ratio and proportion and for students studying the higher tier pathways Algebraic fractions.

Transformations

Through this unit, students will discover the concept of congruency, and transformations, including translation, rotation, reflection and enlargement. Students will need these skills to identify line, rotational and planes of symmetry in 2D and 3D shapes. Students need to be able to combine transformation and describe using a single transformation.

Number

Through this unit, students will use mental methods of calculation using positive and negative numbers, divisibility methods and powers and roots. Students will develop their knowledge of factors, multiples and primes to progress to prime factor decomposition and using prime factors to calculate the highest common factor and lowest common multiple.  Students will need these skills and knowledge to support with using Venn diagrams to identify highest common factor and lowest multiples at GCSE and index laws to support their understanding of standard form, fractional and negative indices and simplifying surds and rationalising denominators for students following the higher tier pathway.

Expressions and equations

Through this unit of work students will develop the skills of expanding brackets and factorising expressions, they will begin to solve one step and two step equations and simplify algebraic expressions involving powers.

Straight line graphs

Through this unit of work, students will develop their skills of drawing and interpreting graphs to identify direct proportion from a graph, plotting straight line graphs and calculating gradients and using equations to identify the gradient and y intercept. Students will need these skills for future units of work such as identifying equations of lines parallel to the x and y axis and to solve simultaneous equations graphically. For students studying the higher tier these skills will be required when calculating the equation of a tangent from a circle.

Mastery Achievables

Area and volume

Through this unit of work, students will use their knowledge of calculating area of a rectangle to derive the formula to calculate the area of triangles, parallelograms and trapezia. Students will develop an understanding of volume and surface area for 3D shapes and this will lead onto students being able to identify properties of 3D shapes including identifying plans and elevations. Students will need to develop the necessary skills to allow them to convert between units of measure specifically for area, volume and capacity and to confidently be able to convert between metric and imperial units. Students will develop these skills further to include calculating volume and surface area of prisms and cones, pyramids and spheres for students at GCSE. Students will need to be able to transfer the skill of converting between units for future units of work such as multiplicative reasoning and similarity and congruence for both tiers at GCSE.

Statistics, graphs and charts

Through this unit of work students will develop different ways of displaying data such as pie charts, stem and leaf diagrams, scatter graphs and two-way tables. Students will use skills from previous years to calculate mean and an estimate of range from a frequency table. Students will need to use their knowledge of mode, median and mean and range to allow them to compare data and have the skills to identify and criticise misleading graphs. Students will need these skills to support future units of work, such as calculating estimated mean from a grouped frequency table, frequency polygons at foundation and cumulative frequency, histograms, box plots and interquartile range for students following the higher tier pathway at GCSE.

Real life graphs

Through this unit of work, students will use their knowledge of drawing and interpreting bar charts and line graphs to draw and interpret conversion, distance-time graphs, real life graphs and curved graphs. Students will need to make links between gradient of a graph and speed to interpret graphs. Students will need these skills for future units of work on straight line and quadratic graphs, where students will be required to calculate the gradient of a line and identify the y intercept and turning points. Students following the higher tier pathway need the skills to interpret velocity time graphs and to identify regions using inequalities, along with cubic graphs.

Decimals and ratio

Through this unit of work, students will further develop their skills of working with decimals by rounding to a given number of decimal places and significant figures. Students will consolidate their knowledge of multiplying and dividing numbers to support their understanding of multiplying and dividing decimals. Students will need to make the links between decimals and ratio and proportion, sharing a quantity by a ratio and using unitary method with decimals.

Mastery Achievables

Lines and angles

Through this unit of work, students will further develop their knowledge of 2D shapes, applying this to angles in parallel lines and interior and exterior angles of polygons and making the connections between these skills to solve geometric problems. Students will need these skills to support future units of work such as construction and bearings. For students following the higher tier pathway geometric proof, circle theorems and congruency.

Percentages, decimals and fractions

Through this unit of work, students will develop their knowledge by converting time into decimals, they will be able to identify terminating and recurring decimals and converting mixed numbers to decimals and percentages and will calculate a percentage of amounts, increase or decrease using multipliers. Students will need these skills for future units of work such as calculating simple and compound interest, direct and inverse proportion, reverse percentages and percentage change. For students studying the higher tier pathway they will use these skills to convert between recurring decimals and fractions and vice versa.

Mastery Achievables

LITERATURE: Full prose text considering the theme of revenge and honour.  Text studied ‘Long Way Down’ or ‘Ghost Boys’.

The texts ‘Long Way Down’ and ‘Ghost Boys’ provide the Academy with exciting opportunities to address current societal issues in two very different narrative formats.

The texts have various themes that are relevant to students including gun crime, race and subcultural norms and values. This gives students the opportunity to consider how contexts are interwoven with texts in order to create meaning. The texts also offer the students opportunities to examine ethical issues surrounding poverty and the violence that can often be associated with it.

Since gang violence is becoming more prevalent in the UK the texts present the opportunities for students to consider relatable male characters who learn moralistic lessons about cyclical violence and the deaths that can result from it. In this way both texts also provide opportunities to link into the teaching of PHSE and provide the opportunity to open a dialogue around the themes they unflinchingly confront.

The texts also provide students with the opportunities to examine different textual styles.  They are able to examine more clearly the impact and power of language including individual words and repeated imagery that cycles through each text.

The theme focus of revenge gives students the opportunity to consider the universality of this theme and how it is reflected in different texts.

LANGUAGE: Creative writing and fiction reading

Students will be developing their skills by practicing their language paper 1 key skills.  The students will be asked to explore and develop their creative reading and writing skills.  The study of language allows students to develop key skills such as comprehension of long fiction texts and retrieval of information. They will be able to identify aspects and conventions of creative writing which they can transfer to their own personal examples of creative writing.  The ability to create logical meanings and inferences from a text is a skill needed in their wider everyday life and careers as they will be reading from a range of sources.

Mastery Achievables

LITERATURE: Shakespeare.  ‘Much Ado About Nothing’ or ‘Twelfth Night’

Shakespeare remains a key component within the English Curriculum due to its relevancy of topics and themes regardless of time period. With students going on to study ‘Macbeth’ at GCSE, ‘Much Ado About Nothing’ or ‘Twelfth Night’ are both valuable plays to be studied.  The aim of the curriculum is to develop our students’ appreciation of the works of Shakespeare, following an Introduction to Shakespeare and extract work focusing on ‘Romeo and Juliet’ analysis in Year 7.  ‘Much Ado About Nothing’ and ‘Twelfth Night’ are both accessible texts for whole text study in Year 8. They include concepts which are relatable to a teenager as they deal with the important issues of gender, relationships, jealousy and social justice.  Both plays are considered to be Shakespearean comedies. Both ‘Much Ado About Nothing’ and ‘Twelfth Night’ entertain pupils with a cleverly disguised clash of personalities and series of confrontations not dissimilar to modern ‘soaps’ and reality television.

Contextual factors such as the role of women, contemporary views about marriage and social conformity allow students to begin to understand the influence of history on a writer and the way in which a writer presents this through character, theme and plot; all significant aspects required for GCSE English Literature examination.

LANGUAGE: Transactional writing and non-fiction reading

During this unit of study students will be extending the introduction they had to transactional writing during year 7 to include the skills to argue and persuade by using the narrative of the well love poem The Lady of Shallot as impetus to help formulate strong ideas. The fairy-tale esque nature of this poem provides students with a classic springboard into expressing strong ideas and formulating convincing arguments, whilst also helping to refine and develop their choice of vocabulary.

Students will also analyse non-fiction texts from both the 20th and 21st Centuries. These will be on the topic of Women’s Rights which is an issue which is still relevant to society today. By analysing the perspectives and language choices of Emmaline Pankhurst and Emma Watson students will be encouraged to consider how far society has changed for women and make determinations as to how far there is still to go for our society to achieve gender parity. This will allow students to develop strong critical opinions on the key issues expressed in a text alongside considering how non-fiction writer use language to affect their audiences.

Mastery Achievables

LITERATURE: Dystopian genre study.

Students to complete an overview of the Dystopian genre including various authors and text types including YA fiction in order to examine how authors use different versions of the real world to present their own idea.  Dystopian fiction presents a unique opportunity to examine contextual factors and their intrinsic link to textual content. Students will also be able to explore how authors use symbolic representations to create a sense of otherness.

Often authors create societies, that are similar to our own, yet with striking and often horrifying differences resulting from political, religious or scientific extremes. This allows authors to create social and political messages through their texts meaning students will explore a vast range of political and cultural comments made by the authors.

Dystopia is particularly exciting and engaging since it is often unexpected and deeply imaginative which means students will find the extract engaging. The range of texts in the anthology provides a broad introduction to the genre allowing students the space to explore this field of literary fiction and experience various different creative worlds that are all formulated in different ways and for different reasons.

LANGUAGE:

Linking in to the study of the Dystopian genre students will also study Dystopian fiction through Language Paper 1 skills focusing on both structural features of texts which create effects and how language creates meaning. Analysing an extract from The Hunger Games Mockingjay allows students an accessible platform to the analysis of structure as well as opening a dialogue around what comments the author wants to make about social class and how this is expressed through language.

Students will also develop their skills on narrative and descriptive writing activities based around the dystopian genre.

Mastery Achievables

Biology: Organisms

Students will study gas exchange systems in mammals before looking at the effects of drugs, alcohol and smoking on human health. Secondly, students will study the digestive system in humans and discover how balanced or unbalanced diets effect health.

Chemistry: Earth

Students will look at the human impact on the Earth. They will initially do this by studying global warming and its effects on our climate. Following on from this they will study the use, and misuse, of the Earth’s resources, by looking at extracting metals and recycling.

Physics: Forces

Students will build on their understanding of force from year 7 by studying deformation of objects as well as friction and drag. The second half of the topic concentrates on the study of pressure by looking at its effects on solids, liquids and gases.

Mastery Achievables

Biology: Eco-Systems

In this unit students will study three of the main process that are vital for life. This include aerobic and anaerobic respiration and photosynthesis. Students will discover who scientists use these processes in everyday life, for example the use of yeast in baking. When studying photosynthesis students will carry out investigations to determine factors that will limit the rate of the process.

Chemistry: Matter

Students will study some of the fundamental principles in chemistry during this topic. They will look at atoms, elements, compounds and chemical formulas. This work will be vital to underpin their study of chemistry at the GCSE level. The students will then move on to study different groups of elements within the periodic table by discovering patterns in the reactivity of similar elements.

Physics: Electromagnetism

Students will study the basic principles of electricity and electromagnetism. Initially by looking at how circuits are built and how we measure electrical flow and potential. The second half of the unit will concentrate on the building and use of electromagnets.

Mastery Achievables

Biology: Genes

In this chapter students will study both evolution and inheritance. Within evolution, students will look at the process of natural selection and the work completed by Charles Darwin, as part of this study they will also looks at the extinction of species and how to preserve biodiversity in the modern world. In the study of inheritance, students will discover how characteristics are passed form parents to their offspring and how Scientists can alter the genes of organisms to change certain physical traits.

Chemistry: Reactions

This unit builds on some of the work students did during their year 7 chemistry to look at more complicated chemical reactions, such as combustion and thermal decomposition. They will then move on to examine the importance of energy in chemical reactions and begin to predict thermal changes in different reactions.

Physics: Energy & Waves

Students will continue their work on energy changes from chemistry to investigate some of the fundamental principles of heating and cooling and will be able to describe thermal energy transfers in detail. Within the waves topic students will build on their knowledge of sound waves from year 7.

Mastery Achievables

Developing the formal elements.

Experimental drawing from observation.

Exposure to a wide range of materials and techniques.

Developing competency and confidence of application of media.

Annotation, critique and reflection.

Mastery Achievables

Contextual and contemporary connections and artist research.

Developing descriptive and analytical language both written and visual.

Experimentation and design development and refinement.

Mastery Achievables

Production of a mixed media 3D sculpture investigating texture, line, form and negative and positive space.

Critical analysis and annotation.

Extending the drawing practice through developing the 3D sculpture in to a 2D body of work.

Mastery Achievables

Core Course Topics:

  • Computer Crime
  • Cyber Security

This unit covers some of the legal safeguards regarding computer use, including overviews of the Computer Misuse Act, Data Protection Act and Copyright Law and their implications for computer use. Phishing scams and other email frauds, hacking, “data harvesting” and identity theft are discussed together with ways of protecting online identity and privacy. Health and Safety Law and environmental issues such as the safe disposal of old computers are also discussed.

Students will understand a range of ways to use technology safely, respectfully, responsibly and securely, including protecting their online identity and privacy; recognise inappropriate content, contact and conduct and know how to report concerns.

Students will be able to identify online criminal activity, be able identify online security threats, be able to recognise the signs of fraudulent emails and understand the principles of the computer misuse act.

Students will be able to protect themselves online and be able to protect personal data online.

Mastery Achievables

Core Course Topics:

  • Graphic Skills
  • Computational Thinking

This is an introduction to graphics and graphic file types. The unit explores how bitmap and vector images are represented and stored by the computer. There is also opportunity for pupils to practise skills in design, photo editing and image manipulation using layers to create a movie poster using a suitable graphics package such as Photoshop.

Students will be able to recognise the difference between a Vector and a Bitmap graphic, be able to identify file types and formats, be able to appropriately format a digital graphic and able to recognise key tools and techniques for creating a digital graphic.

Students will be able to use editing tools to edit and manipulate images including free hand draw, rotate, flip, crop, group/ungroup, resize, use filters, invert colours, layering and possibly masking, create and modify graphic images to meet user requirements and understand ownership of images, copyright, copyright free and gaining permissions.

Students will be able to think algorithmically, be able to understand decomposition and abstraction, be able to convert binary, be able to convert between hexadecimal and denary and be able to add 2 8-bit numbers.

Mastery Achievables

Core Course Topics:

  • Block Based Programming
  • Representation
  • Binary
  • Game Design

This module of study gives students the ability to understand how digital devices understand language and enables human input, the understanding on storage will enable students to store digital information safety and on the correct media.

This unit will give students the ability to understand the ASCII character set and be able to convert ASCII code. Students will be able to recognise how images are stored in computer systems.

Students will develop an understanding of how to plan and test programs, know the importance of testing to ensure working solutions have been developed and be able to identify a problem.

This module will allow students to able to create block-based and/or text-based algorithms to solve a problem e.g. Scratch, Python, Small Basic, be able to stress test the solution to meet the needs of a target audience and be able to evaluate their solution to explain potential future development(s).

Mastery Achievables

What is the future of our planet?

At the end of this unit students will understand the concept of climate change. Both the natural and human causes of climate change will be explored, with students examining how greenhouse gases play a key role in changing our climate with students making links to natural resources. Students will develop their sense of place by assessing the effects of climate change on different places within the world, assessing both the advantages and disadvantages of climate change. Students will investigate how and why Antarctica is at risk of Climate Change, with management strategies being explored in relation to the Antarctic Treaty. Here students will discover the importance of countries working together to ensure the management of Antarctica is sustainable.

Mastery Achievables

Is the Geography of Russia a curse or benefit?

During this unit pupils will be able to describe the location of Russia and be able to identify Russia’s key physical features and describe their distribution using key geographical vocabulary. As part of its physical features, pupils will be able to define what a glacier is, combined with being able to identify and describe the key features of glacial landforms in the context of Russia’s glacial landscape. In addition to this students will explore the key climates and biomes that Russia has to offer and identify and describe the key characteristics associated with these, as well as further practising how to interpret climate graphs for Russia. They will also assess the distribution of Russia’s natural resources and whether the physical geography of Russia is ultimately a curse or a benefit.

What happens when the sea meets the land?

At the end of this unit, students will understand how the coast is shaped by a range of physical processes such as erosion, weathering, transportation and deposition. As part of developing an awareness of these key fluvial processes, they will be able to explain how key erosional landforms such as a cave, arch, stack and stump are formed. Students will also be able to describe and explain what the process of Longshore Drift is, and how this leads to the formation of depositional landforms. Here students will further develop their understanding and awareness of climate change, as they will be able to articulate and suggest how and why coastal areas are at risk from climate change, by making reference to the Holderness Coast. Students will develop an awareness of different management strategies that can be used to protect the coastlines from the effects of physical processes. As a result, students will be able to distinguish the key differences between hard and soft engineering.

Mastery Achievables

How are the world’s populations changing?

During this unit, the process of urbanisation will be further explored, with students assessing how population growth and urbanisation have impacted both human and physical landscapes. As a result, they will be able to suggest how population density is influenced and affected by different types of landscapes. To achieve this, students will be able to describe the world’s population distribution by drawing upon their knowledge of push and pull factors to explain reasons for the world’s population distribution trends.

They will also study population pyramids, where students will examine how the population structure varies between a High Income Country (HIC) and a Low Income Country (LIC), by comparing and interpreting population pyramids. To demonstrate their understanding of how population structures have changed over time for specific countries; students will investigate the causes and impacts of China’s One Child Policy, with students examining and critically thinking about the sustainability of the policy in relation to its long term impacts such as its evident gender imbalance.

Finally by the end of this unit, students should be able to discuss what rural to urban migration is, and apply their knowledge of reasons as to why people migrate in relation to the named example of migration from Mexico to the USA.

How is Asia being transformed?

By the end of this unit students will be able to locate Asia and describe some of its key human and physical features such as Megacities and Biomes. Students will discover what the monsoon season is, along with its key features and effects. Building upon this, students will be able to comment on the effects and responses of a flood event of an LIC within Asia, and be able to explain what factors caused it.

They will also consider how urbanisation has affected a region within India. Lastly, within this unit students will understand the growing economic importance of Asia and how China has changed the balance of world trade. In particular students will investigate the importance of the Three Gorges Dam to China’s economy and examine what other countries can learn from China’s intuitive innovation and engineering.

Mastery Achievables

The English Civil War

This unit of work will give students an opportunity to study to consider how England became a religious and political battleground in the 17th century. Students will be taught to think about their own understanding of religious tolerance in modern society and to then contrast it to the 17th century where religious groups were pitted against each other resulting in a political power struggle.

This part of history is incredibly important and has largely shaped Britain’s political landscape. Issues concerning the power, control and influence of a single monarchical figure were challenged and eventually deconstructed in this period of history and although contemporaries saw this as a radical and dangerous step toward republicanism, modern political commentators and historians alike attribute much of Britain’s political identity and structure to this period of British history.

The French Revolution

This unit of work will give students an opportunity to consider how different groups of people in France came to wield and use power in the late 18th century. Students will think about this in a modern context by thinking about the power that different groups of people in modern society have before then comparing this to France. Students will see links between modern society and French society, which was starting to see radical changes to its political structure, many of which were more in line with the norms of modern British society.

This part of history is incredibly important as the political changes that France saw during revolution were unprecedented. It was the first time that a human rights document (The Declaration of the rights of man and citizen) came into effect in a European country and it was this document that paved the way for fundamental changes to absolute, hereditary monarchies. It is also a contentious topic which splits opinion amongst academics, some of whom believe that the French Revolution did not come close to achieving true equality. Students will use the topic content to engage with this important debate.

Mastery Achievables

Slavery

This unit of work will give students an opportunity to consider a contentious topic that has been interpreted in different ways throughout the history that followed it. Students will need to acknowledge the moral implications of the slave trade whilst also considering why European contemporaries pushed for the slave trade seemingly, putting economic interests ahead of morality. Students study this unit so that they can learn to think about potentially controversial historical topics that, to this day, still provoke debate concerning the accountability of European countries in reference to the slave trade.

This topic is critically important primarily because of its long-term significance. This makes the slave trade a relatively unique historical topic as it encourages students to think beyond the topic by considering how it has informed other historical events such as, for example, the Civil Rights movement in 20th century America. This is an incredibly important skill which demonstrates to students that historical events can influence and shape other parts of history and the world around them.

The British Empire

This unit of work will give students the opportunity to consider how Britain became the ruler of the largest empire covering much of the world. This is partly a continuation of the previous topic on slavery as the British Empire grew due to its trade in people. Students will be taught about the conditions needed for empire building and the effects that colonisation had on Britain and the countries it controlled. Students will start to see links with modern day countries and the links to empire.

This topic is important as the shape of countries worldwide is defined by the impact of Britain’s empire. Language, culture architecture, economic structures, sport, religion and national boundaries were shared between countries that has stamped their mark that can still been seen today. Students will understand the negative aspects of empire as well as the contentious issue of the benefits empire brought to many. To understand the modern world we live in and the interrelation between countries, an understanding of empire is essential.

Mastery Achievables

Industrial Revolution

This unit of work will give students the opportunity to examine the causes and impact of one of the biggest changes that Britain saw in its historical lifetime. Within the space of a 150 years, the demographic make-up on the country dramatically. Students will understand the process Britain went from a mainly agrarian society to and predominantly urban one. They will study the key individuals who were involved in fuelling this revolution and the impact they had. Students will also evaluate the impact that the revolution had on different social groups especially the working class.

This topic is important to study as the rapid changes seen during this time period saw the increase of towns and cities. Industrialisation shaped the political, geographic and demographic landscape we have today in modern Britain Students will be able to directly link their experiences of the local community in Stoke-on Trent to its industrial past.

Social Changes of the 19th and 20th Century

This unit of work will allow students to study significant changes that happened to the population of primarily the United Kingdom. During this time, significant political and social changes and advancements happened. Students will understand the changes occurred within medical improvement especially in the field of disease control and public health. This time period also saw a changing attitude in crime and punishment and students will gain an understanding of the events through source analysis. Finally, students will study the fight for universal suffrage throughout the 19th and early 20th Century especially in the area of women’s suffrage. This unit will allow students to study the key events and individuals involved and the impact they had on society in the short and long-term.

This unit is important for students to understand as they will be able to link modern experiences of public health, judicial and penal systems to previous events. The students will also be able to make links to the equality of women in today’s society.

Mastery Achievables

Students start the autumn term describing their summer holidays. They then move on to talk about and give opinions on mobile technology, TV and music.

Mastery Achievables

The spring term focus is on learning about food and drink, and discussing meal times. Students plan food for a party and learn how to order meals in a café.

Mastery Achievables

In the summer term, students learn how to make arrangements to go out and discuss getting ready to go out. They then learn how to ask for and give directions around town. The final unit of Year 8 is centred around holidays. Students learn to describe holiday homes and compare different holiday activities, and create a brochure for visitors to their town and local area.

Mastery Achievables

Invasion Games

To further develop knowledge and understanding of basic skills, techniques, rules and regulations of all activities and apply them in competitive situations.

Apply basic skills of passing, shooting, footwork, turning, dribbling and ball control in competitive situations.

Develop knowledge and understanding of advanced skills and techniques.

Develop and demonstrate a clear knowledge and understanding of basic attacking and defending tactics in competitive situations.

Gymnastics

To use creativity to develop/ choreograph routines and sequences whilst demonstrating an understanding of aesthetics in performance.

To develop sequences based on balance as individuals and in groups using different parts of the body and level.

Mastery Achievables

Netball

To further develop knowledge and understanding of basic skills, techniques, rules and regulations of all activities and apply them in competitive situations.

Apply the basic skills of serving, forehand and backhand in competitive situations.

Develop knowledge and understanding of advanced skills and techniques.

Apply knowledge and understanding of basic tactics and positional play in competitive situations.

Health-related Fitness

To further develop knowledge and understanding of the components of fitness – aerobic endurance, speed, strength, muscular endurance, agility, co-ordination, and flexibility.

To demonstrate knowledge and understanding on how to prepare for physical activity – warm up, cool down, stretches through delivering a warm-up.

To develop knowledge and understanding of the benefits of a healthy active lifestyle.

Mastery Achievables

Striking and Fielding

To further develop knowledge and understanding of basic skills, techniques, rules and regulations of all activities and apply them in competitive situations.

Apply basic skills of fielding, throwing, catching, batting and bowling in competitive situations

Develop knowledge and understanding of advanced skills and techniques.

Apply knowledge and understanding of basic tactics and positional play (fielding and directional hitting).

Athletics

To develop knowledge and understanding of basic, techniques, rules and regulations of all athletics events.

Develop performance of the basic techniques in sprinting, long-distance running, throwing and jumping events.

Develop knowledge and understanding of advanced skills and techniques.

Apply knowledge and understanding of the factors that affect performance in these events.

Mastery Achievables

Is it our world?

The aim of this unit of learning is to introduce students to some of the pressing issues of the day. Students will look at different religious views of origin. Good foundation to lead onto discussion and evaluation in following lessons about the value of the world which is so hotly debated throughout the world today. Additionally we will look at the response of religion in various ways to natural disasters and pollution (charity and volunteering) and how religions respond to these in other ways. We will also be able to judge our own actions and try to influence others in order to quell the effects of climate change and its effects on our world.

Mastery Achievables

Is death the end?

This particular unit builds on this sensitive topic touched on in HT1 and also brings in ideas of spirituality and how to live a good life that was introduced in year 7. The notion of death is one that affects everyone and is an issue which students will encounter within their lives if they have not done so already. It is key to allow students to understand why death may not seem to be the end for some people but why for others it is. They are given a comfortable low threat environment in which to ask questions and discuss any experiences that they think may be valuable to this course of study and to the student’s wider experience. I want students to study this topic and to take away information which allows them to question different views on the afterlife but also a lifelong skill of being able to ask questions and discuss sensitive topics.

Mastery Achievables

Ultimate questions.

The final topic for year 8 is titled ‘ultimate questions’. This allows students to use the variety skills that have been tailored throughout KS3 and apply these in depth to a number of different areas. We will look back at some of the big questions faced in year 7 and take a fresh view of these to show how student’s skills and knowledge have rapidly progressed over time. Additionally, we will focus on key age appropriate religious/ philosophical texts in order for students to gain the wide breadth of what Religion, worldviews and philosophy is about.

Mastery Achievables

Timbers

Students will further develop their experience in using a range of timber working tools and equipment to produce a working wood object in response to a given brief or set of instructions.

Students will answer a brief to design or make something which carries meaning (e.g. application of symbol, a product with emotional relevance to user, an object for use in advertising or campaign) and that ‘performs’ (e.g. mechanisms).

Students will use and understand appropriate use of a coping saw and a tenon saw. Learn skills using a pillar drill and screwdriver. Understanding of different finishes include use of glass paper, the sanding machine and stain/paint/dye etc.

Students will gain further knowledge of wood joints and appropriate use. The origins of Timber and difference between hardwoods and softwoods.

Students will perform product analysis of an existing product and be able to evaluate and conduct functional testing.

Paper & board

Students will develop their experience of using a range of paper and board materials to answer a given brief or set of instructions.

Students will answer a brief to design or make something which carries meaning (e.g. symbol, logo, infographic, persuasive poster or campaign).

Students will develop quality and effective communication within a range of ideas based on a brief and develop ideas using feedback from others.

Working with paper and board students will grow in independence and competence. Students will gain knowledge of the application of different adhesives for paper and board and the effective application of colour and design.

Students will develop their understanding of appropriate selection of paper and board, nets, more complex 3D structures or 2D layouts, scoring and perforation and applying colour theory.

Students will use different techniques for analysing of existing design work or the work of others.

Mastery Achievables

Food Studies

Students will further develop their experience of using a range of ingredients, cooking methods and recipes following set instructions. They will develop their understanding of nutrition and healthy eating.

Students will be introduced to the concept of food carrying meaning.

Students will develop confidence in adapting and refining a range of dishes with a focus on Nutrition and finish.

Students will learn about food waste. Produce a range of cultural dishes. Growing their competence in using a range of tools, equipment and methods.

Students will learn the importance of temperatures and understand the difference between micronutrients and macronutrients.

Students will Develop their use of effective sensory analysis to explore key terms of flavour and consistency and develop different techniques to evaluate the effectiveness of a series of practical outcomes.

Mastery Achievables
Mathematics

Mathematics is a creative and highly inter-connected discipline that is essential to everyday life, critical to science, technology, and engineering, and necessary for financial literacy and most forms of employment. At Thistley Hough Academy, we provide a foundation for understanding the world, the ability to reason mathematically, an appreciation of the beauty and power of mathematics, and a sense of enjoyment and curiosity about the subject.

English

Students at Thistley Hough Academy study both English Language and Literature in following the AQA GCSE specifications.

The study of English Language prepares students to write analytically and in detail; develop critical reading skills; hone the skill of structuring a cohesive argument and become perceptive and sensitive communicators who are able to read and write with a high degree of technical accuracy.

English Literature develops students’ knowledge and skills in reading, writing and critical thinking.  It provides students with opportunities to read a range of texts in the genres of prose, poetry and drama.  Students are assessed on their ability to analyse and compare literary texts, explore ambiguity and read a range of different forms and genres by British writers.

Science

All students at Thistley Hough Academy study Biology, Chemistry and Physics in their Science lessons. As Science teachers, we aspire to fulfil our vision of “empowering students with the skills, curiosity and resilience for 21st Century life in our community.”

We strongly believe that the Science curriculum is more important than ever to develop young people for work in the near future, that will be defined by human interaction with technology and science.

We will achieve this through the use of both practical and theoretical lessons. The practical lessons will develop the pupil’s ability to explore the world around them, develop questions they may have about natural phenomena and design experiments to test their theories.

Theoretical lessons generally concentrate understanding on scientific concepts to underpin the practical lessons and the history of Scientific developments.

Art

The Art and Design Programme combines a conceptual framework with subject specific practical skills. As well as underpinning the teaching and learning of Art and Design, the Key Concepts, which drive the programme, explore the value and impact of Pattern, Structure, Meaning, Human Interaction, Performance and Practice.

Art and Design offers opportunities for students to develop their creativity, imagination and problem solving skills through visual, tactile and formal elements. Students develop techniques through experimenting with a wide range of media in response to the disciplines of Art, whilst developing practical, technical and critical skills, communicating their ideas, feelings and meanings in response to the work of artists and designers.

Computing

Students at Thistley Hough Academy study both Creative iMedia and GCSE Business in following the OCR GCSE specifications. The overall aim is to give learners a broad education that encourages creativity and equips them with the knowledge and skills to understand and change the world.

There are three district strands within computing, each of which is complementary to the other:

1. Computer Science (CS)
2. Information Technology (IT)
3. Digital Literacy (DL)

Computer Science is the scientific and practical study of computation: what can be computed, how to compute it, and how computation may be applied to the solution of problems. Information Technology is concerned with how computers and telecommunications equipment work, and how they may be applied to storage, retrieval, transmission and manipulation of data. Digital Literacy is the ability to effectively, responsibly, safely and critically navigate, evaluate and create digital artefacts using a range of digital technologies. The creation of digital artefacts will be integrated to much of the learning of computing. Digital artefacts can take many forms, including digital images, computer programs, spreadsheets, 3D animations and a digital booklet. At Thistley Hough Academy, we have designed a tailored computing curriculum to enable learners to successfully progress to a range of courses at College and University.

Our curriculum model provides learners with a solid foundation to pursue a wide range of career pathways:

– Software Developer, Database Administrator, Computer Hardware Engineer
– Computer Systems Analyst, Computer Networks Architect, Web Developer
– Information Security Analyst, Computer Research Scientist, Graphics Designer

Geography

At Thistley Hough Academy, our students will understand what it is to be a Geographer. Students will have a curiosity in finding out about the world and its people. They will have developed a passion and commitment to the subject. Our students will have developed an excellent knowledge of where places are and what they are like. They will have an understanding of the ways in which places are interdependent and interconnected, and how human and physical environments are interrelated. Pupils will develop an understanding of the issues facing a diverse range of places and people now and in the future, including how we can become more sustainable to help support our ever changing world.

Our pupils will have an extensive core of geographical knowledge and vocabulary, and will be able to communicate this, in a variety of ways, routinely. They will have good spatial awareness, and be able to use a wide range of maps effectively to investigate places. They will be able to carry out increasingly complex, independent geographical enquiry, ask their own relevant questions, make sense of geographical data, think critically about different views and justify their own view in reaching conclusions.

History

History at Thistley Hough Academy, encourages students to think critically about a wide variety of historical questions and to develop a broad range of historical knowledge.

In years 7, 8 and 9 students study a range of topics that will provide a solid background for GCSE study.

History plays a key role in developing our students into confident, successful adults. History requires students to develop an enquiring, critical mind especially in response to causation and consequence in regard to historical events. History as a discipline is highly regarded within the academic field and workplace.

Modern Foreign Languages

At Thistley Hough Academy, our aim is to equip all learners of MFL with a strong foundation across the four skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking. With a good understanding of the basic grammar and structures of the language, together with a secure basic vocabulary for dealing with a variety of known and unknown contexts, learners are able to move on to the next stage of language study with increasing confidence and proficiency. Through the study of foreign languages, we endeavour to embed cultural appreciation of the people and countries where French and Spanish are spoken. Our five year programme of study aims to maximise the progress and success of every student, irrespective of their starting point in foreign language learning.

Physical Education

The primary purpose of Physical Education at Thistley Hough Academy is to develop in young people an understanding of the positive impact an active lifestyle will have on their lives. The developmentally appropriate curriculum also provides a unique learning environment where affective, psychomotor and cognitive skills can be developed. In addition, good health practices, teamwork, sportsmanship, self-control, communication, resilience, and the opportunity for positive social interaction with peers are encouraged. Using leadership opportunities, students will be able to further build on these skills and characteristics as well as improving confidence. Research clearly shows that the active, healthy child is more likely to be academically motivated and establish habits of behaviour that will promote lives that are models of wellness.

Relgious Education

Religious Education at Thistley Hough Academy, encourages students to think critically about a wide variety of religious, ethical and philosophical questions.

RE plays a key role in developing our students into caring, confident, successful adults. This means not only striving for the highest standards of academic success for all our students and equipping them with the key skills for further learning and the world of work, but also providing them with the opportunities to formulate their own sets of values and beliefs about the world we live in.

Design Technology and Food Studies

In Design Technology, students have the chance to learn and explore a wealth of creative new skills. Learning is purposeful and relevant as students in all lessons see a direct link to industry, a career, and the influence of technology on our past, present and future. Students within DT use their creativity and imagination across a variety of disciplines to plan, design and make prototypes/dishes that solve real world problems. Students build their knowledge in many theoretical areas including contemporary technologies, materials and processes, design movements, nutrition and current world topics including sustainability and social responsibility.

We teach Design Technology as the practical strand of CET Knowledge Connected with the key concepts to the fore, whilst also fulfilling the requirements of the National Curriculum. The curriculum is taught across a range of material disciplines. These include, but are not limited to, Food and Nutrition, Timber based materials, Textiles, and Papers and Boards. The curriculum is modern, interesting and allows pupils to discover and develop their talents. It equips students with cutting edge knowledge, essential practical life skills and prepares them with an abundance of transferable skills that are desirable for further study and prospective careers.

The vision for learners in Design Technology is to progress from Year 7 to Year 9 as independent, collaborative and competent students that can analyse, problem solve, design, reflect, apply, make, evaluate and, have an in-depth understanding of the theoretical topics relating to Design and Technology.

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Mastery Achievables

Calculating with fractions

Through this unit of work, students will use their knowledge of equivalent fractions to compare and order fractions with different denominators, begin to calculate with fractions of different denominators and mixed numbers. Students will need these skills for future units of work such as calculating percentages of amounts, ratio and proportion and for students studying the higher tier pathways Algebraic fractions.

Straight line graphs

Through this unit of work, students will develop their skills of drawing and interpreting graphs to identify direct proportion from a graph, plotting straight line graphs and calculating gradients and using equations to identify the gradient and y intercept. Students will need these skills for future units of work such as identifying equations of lines parallel to the x and y axis and to solve simultaneous equations graphically. For students studying the higher tier these skills will be required when calculating the equation of a tangent from a circle.

Fractions, decimals and percentages

Through this unit of work, students will develop their knowledge by converting time into decimals, they will be able to identify terminating and recurring decimals and converting mixed numbers to decimals and percentages and will calculate a percentage of amounts, increase or decrease using multipliers. Students will need these skills for future units of work such as calculating simple and compound interest, direct and inverse proportion, reverse percentages and percentage change. For students studying the higher tier pathway they will use these skills to convert between recurring decimals and fractions and vice versa.

Number

Through this unit of work, students will discover prime factor decomposition and using Venn diagrams to calculate the HCF and LCM of two or more numbers. Students will develop an understanding of the laws of indices and correct index notation. Students will learn and use the ‘not equal to’ symbol and how to use a calculator effectively.

Algebra

In this unit students look at correct algebraic notation, simplifying expressions including index laws, substitution, formulae, expanding brackets, factorising and writing expressions.

Mastery Achievables

Graphs, tables and charts

Throughout this unit, students will learn how to represent data using different tables, charts and graphs. Students will develop knowledge of how to represent data using frequency tables, two-way tables, dual and comparative bar charts, lines graphs, time series, stem and leaf diagrams, pie charts and scatter graphs.

Fractions, ratio and percentages

In this unit of work pupils develop an understanding of fractions by comparing the size of fractions, calculating with fractions converting fractions, decimals and percentages and calculating percentage of amounts.

Equations, inequalities and sequences

Through this unit of work students will build on their prior learning of finding unknown numbers in number sentences and apply this to finding an unknown number in an equation. Students will incorporate expanding brackets into solving equations and begin to solve inequalities. Students will substitute into formulae and discover how to find the nth term of a sequence using the term to term rule.

Mastery Achievables

Angles

In this unit of work students will develop an understanding of angles in parallel lines, angles in a triangle, exterior and interior angles and geometric problems. Knowledge of angles will be needed later when studying bearings. Students will use their prior knowledge to describe 2D shapes, calculate angles on a straight line and in triangle to calculate angles in parallel lines. Students need to have mastered these skills to transfer these skills to form and solve algebraic equations.

Averages and range

In this unit students consolidate knowledge on averages (mean, median and mode) and range.  They apply this knowledge to stem and leaf diagrams and extend into finding the estimate of the mean.  Students are introduced to the idea of an outlier and how this can skew data as well as sampling.

Mastery Achievables

LITERATURE: Full prose text considering the theme of power.  Text studied ‘Of Mice and Men’ or ‘Animal Farm’.

It is a necessity that all students are adept at analysing a range of texts from different historical and social contexts.  This will include: the writers’ use of language and devices; the writers’ intentions and structural devices for effect. Through the analysis of ‘Animal Farm’ or ‘Of Mice and Men’, students will develop their analytical style, considering overarching contextual influences of the time.  Orwell wrote ‘Animal Farm’ after his experiences in the Spanish Civil War, whereas Steinbeck wrote ‘Of Mice and Men’ after his experiences in The Great Depression in 1930s America.

Written as an allegorical novel and having been banned in many countries, the intrinsic messages within the novel still hold significance in the modern world. Orwell’s anthropomorphic use of the differing animals further enables students to consider wider ideas of leadership, power, control and corruption.  Whereas Steinbeck’s insightful consideration of race, gender and age discrimination amongst the disempowered and disadvantaged in society remains controversial today.

Both novels are literary classics of the modern time, and as such will remain in the  students consciousness long after they have finished reading them.  Whether it be through textual study or wider understanding it will impact upon their views of Citizenship and history.

LANGUAGE: Creative writing and fiction reading

This unit seeks to develop both students’ ability to find implicit and explicit information from a text as well as develop their ability to analyse language and structure, as well as their evaluative skills.  The module will also develop students’ creative writing skills from those demonstrated in Year 8.  It is taught explicitly and complements the English Literature course provision.  English Language Paper 1 Question 5 skills are enhanced by using extracts from the current novel.  It is important that pupils read a range of extracts and in Year 9, they are reading more challenging extracts in which meaning may not always be obvious.

Pupils should now be looking at reading a whole text and be able to comment on how structural techniques have been used to engage and challenge a reader.  Pupils should be able to comment on how texts are shaped to introduce character and reveal important plot details at the precise moment to have an impact on the way a text is enjoyed.  Pupils will develop the critical analysis to be able to subjectively make comments on how characters are presented and be able to evaluate how characters are presented.

Mastery Achievables

LITERATURE: Shakespeare. ‘King Lear’ or ‘Othello’

In this unit, pupils will have the opportunity to analyse how the theme of deceit is presented by Shakespeare as a running motif and through his deft use of characterisation.

Shakespeare remains to this day, possibly the most important writer that Great Britain has produced and his inclusion on the English Literature examination for every pupil in the country to study is a clear signal of how important his works are to this day.

Throughout years 7 and 8 students will have read extracts from two different Shakespeare plays which means they have a good grounding with which to approach the more challenging texts of ‘Othello’ and ‘King Lear’. Pupils will have had the opportunity to read a part of ‘Romeo and Juliet’ in Year 7, before moving on to ‘Much Ado About Nothing’/’Twelfth Night’.  ‘King Lear’ or ‘Othello’ have been chosen for study as the themes of betrayal and family conflict are very accessible and something which pupils at the chosen age are able to understand.  Both plays are considered to be some of Shakespeare’s more challenging works and have more complex plots than the plays the students have previously studied.

Students will build on the knowledge of the life and times of William Shakespeare, the historical context of his works and the theatre which was introduced in Year 7 and developed during Year 8.  Pupils will largely read key scenes from ‘King Lear’ or ‘Othello’ that will allow them to demonstrate their understanding of Shakespeare’s language and how his plays have been crafted for his audience as well as being able to discuss how the theme of deceit builds throughout the play that they are studying.

Pupils will have to answer a question based on one of Shakespeare’s plays for their GCSE exam which will make up 20% of their final GCSE grade.  To do this, they will need to be able to use their knowledge of the plays, be able to interpret and comment on the use of language and demonstrate an understanding of the main themes and context of the plays.  This unit of study will allow pupils to familiarise themselves with the era in which Shakespeare was writing, what influenced him to write the plays and an understanding of the audience that he was writing for.

LANGUAGE: Transactional writing and non-fiction reading

Students will be integrating their study of Shakespeare with Language paper 2 Transactional writing. This scheme aims to both build on skills on transactional writing demonstrated during KS2 and previous years of KS3 alongside the study of a full Shakespeare text. The purpose of this integration is to allow the characterisation studied in Shakespeare (either Lear or Othello) to provide a springboard for demonstrating a convincing strong persuasive ‘voice’ in an argument. The deep understanding of the Shakespeare text allows students the opportunity to form discerning points for their argument exploring the themes in the text and distinguishing between stronger and weaker arguments that characters could make. Both characters chosen to write persuasively are female allowing students to ‘give voice’ to the characters traditionally marginalised and victimised in the play giving space for a discussion on context and providing ample opportunity for engagement and an chance to practice and develop using language choices to demonstrate strength and subtle persuasion. This also allows students the opportunity to develop their understanding of the role of women in both Elizabethan society but in society today and how women would traditionally voice concern and how language used by women has developed more recently. The skill of using discerning argumentative strategies is a key skill that students need to develop for question 4, paper 1 on their Language GCSE.

Mastery Achievables

LITERATURE

We have an exciting new play that is going to be introduced in the summer of year 9.  Watch this space for more details!

LANGUAGE

Watch this space!

Mastery Achievables

Biology: Cell Biology

This GCSE unit build upon the cells work that pupils completed in year 7. A more detailed study of cell structure is undertaken, with different parts of the cell linked to different processes that pupils studied in year 8. Students will also study how substance can move into and out of cells, followed by exploration of stem cells and future stem cell technology.

Chemistry: Atomic Structure and Periodic Table

Students will again build on their work of atoms in year 8 to learn about the detailed structure of atoms and how the current scientific model has developed over time. This work comprises of the study of scientists such as Ernest Rutherford and James Chadwick. When exploring the periodic table, students will use their knowledge of atomic structure to understand the reactivity patterns they studied in year 8.

Physics: Energy

In this unit, students will build on their energy work in year 7 and 8 to further study the scientific principles behind energy transfers. This will include using equations to calculate quantities of energy required in specific situations, for example in elastic energy stores or kinetic energy transfers. Students will then move on to study thermal energy transfers and link their knowledge to heating and insulting buildings. Finally, students will look at energy demands in the 21st century, and how a variety of resources can meet the UKs energy need and still reduce carbon dioxide emissions.

Mastery Achievables

Biology: Organisation

In this topic students will discover some of the large organ systems in the human body. A detailed examination of the digestive system and the cardiovascular system is undertaken. Students will also study non-communicable diseases such as heart disease and cancers, learning about the causes and risk factors of these diseases as well treatments.

Chemistry: Bonding and Structure & Chemistry of the Atmosphere

In this unit of work students will complete an in-depth study of how different atoms form chemical bonds, the students will then link their knowledge of chemical bonds to describe the structure of different materials. In the second chemistry unit studied this term, students will build on their previous work of the Earth’s structure to study how humans are having an impact on the climate through the release of greenhouse gases.

Physics: Particle model of matter

In this unit students will again build on key work undertaken in year 7 and 8 on solids, liquids and gases to explain why matter will undergo changes of state. This include work of internal energy and specific latent heat. In addition, students will be able to carry out calculation to calculate the density of an object, a skill that is vital to support other topics in their GCSE studies.

Mastery Achievables

Biology: Infection and Response

Following on from the work on non-communicable disease in term 2, year 9 students will then study communicable disease and pathogens. A detailed investigation of bacterial, viral, fungal and protozoal diseases is undertaken. This includes, but is not limited to, work on HIV, salmonella, measles and malaria. Students will also study treatments to these diseases and how scientists develop new medicines.

Chemistry: Using Resources

This unit looks at the practical application of chemical knowledge in society. This may be through the study of making sure we have an adequate supply of clean water, know how to extract metals from their ores and discover the importance of recycling. Towards the end of the topic students will look at the life cycle assessments of products to determine their impact on the environment.

Physics: Atomic Structure

Following on from their study of atomic structure, students will use their knowledge of the atomic model to discover the three types of nuclear radiation. The student will link the composition of radioactive particles to the nucleus and discover uses and dangers of each type of particle. A study of radioactive half-lives will also be undertaken with students being able to calculate the activity of radioactive elements from graphical information.

Mastery Achievables

Understanding human form and proportion.

Understanding facial proportions and structure.

Analyse and draw features of the face in a wide range of media.

Using media and techniques to convey and express emotion of the face.

Mastery Achievables

Contextual and contemporary connections and exploration of techniques and processes, and styles in art.

Independent selection and research of an artist chosen by the student.

Experimentation and design development and refinement and scale and transformation.

Exposure to composition of portraiture and balance.

Mastery Achievables

Realisation of the final 2D painted piece in the style of the artist research in Spring 1.

Realisation of final low relief in the style of the artist research in Spring 1.

Mastery Achievables

Core Course Topics:

  • Graphical User Interface
  • Mobile app development
  • Legislation
  • Promotional Materials

Students will be able to identify common features in effective graphics user interfaces, create a simple GUI, be able to plan a GUI based on user needs and be able to design navigation maps for GUI.

Being able to understand how computer systems operate in the real world and improve their interaction with them.

This unit will enable pupils to create a complete app with full takeaway functionality on an iPhone, Android, Windows or Blackberry smartphone as well as a desktop web browser in class. Students will plan and implement their own projects using skills from teacher demonstration app which creates a guide to the Periodic table including image galleries, video, interactive maps, and web links. Students will also be able to program extensions to their own apps using the built-in language Blockly. The unit will be assessed using an assessment portfolio and the completed apps can also be made available for parents and teachers to view online.

Mastery Achievables

Core Course Topics:

  • Graphical User Interface
  • Mobile app development
  • Legislation
  • Promotional Materials
  • Text Based Programming
  • Networks
  • Encryption

Computers are fantastic – they help us to learn, share, communicate and find entertainment. However, it is also possible for computers to be used to aid illegal activities. An understanding of computer-related laws in the United Kingdom is needed to make sure we stay on the right side of the law.

Computers might be used unlawfully in many ways, for example: allowing someone to illegally share your personal data, helping to steal financial information, such as credit card numbers or bank account details, helping to illegally copy and distribute films, television programmes and music and extorting information or blackmailing someone.

Students will be able to understand legislation fundamentals of the Computer Misuse act, Creative Comms licencing, Copyright and patent act, GPDR , Data protection act and Software licencing.

Be able to produce a promotional product.

Students will be able to write input and output statements, be able to create variables, be able to create selection statements. Students will have the ability to apply knowledge of digital laws in any subject that is using digital platforms and understand how programmes work and apply the same logic and problem-solving ability to other subjects and problems.

Mastery Achievables

Core Course Topics:

  • Text Based Programming
  • Networks
  • Encryption
  • Advanced Programming skills
  • Programming Project

This unit assumes that pupils already have some prior experience in Python or a similar language, and the first lesson has a series of tasks designed to revisit the basic skills already covered. Pupils then use for loops and compare their use with while loops, before moving on to arrays (lists), which are introduced as a new data structure and are used in conjunction with for loops. Procedures and functions with parameters are covered to help pupils understand the concept and benefits of modular programming. Students will be able to create iteration statements, be able to use a built-in function and be able to create a function.

This is a theoretical unit covering the basic principles and architecture of local and wide area networks. Pupils will learn that the World Wide Web is part of the Internet, and how web addresses are constructed and stored as IP addresses using DNS. Pupils will learn about data transmission and through an understanding of different network topologies and network hardware, they will plan the structure of a local area network. Client-server, peer-to-peer networks and the concept of cloud computing are all described. Ways of keeping data secure and simple encryption techniques are also covered.

Students will be able understand and identify network topologies, be able to understand the process of encryption and understand advantages and disadvantages of network hardware. Students will be able to identify a problem and apply text-based algorithms to solve a problem e.g. Python, Small Basic, JavaScript, be able to robustly test the solution to meet the needs of a target audience, be able to evaluate their solution to justify potential future development(s).

Students will be able to understand how programmes work and apply the same logic and problem-solving ability to other subjects and problems, understand how programmes work and apply the same logic and problem-solving ability to other subjects and problems.

Mastery Achievables

Why is the Middle East an important world region?

Students will investigate the region of the Middle East, being able to describe its location and locate specific countries and physical features within the region. They will be aware of the location and distribution of the region’s physical features and climate zones, and be able to explain how this influences the distribution of population. The importance of oil to the region will be investigated, as students will assess the energy security of the UK and discuss whether the UK should continue trading with the Middle East for oil and gas. Students will be introduced to the issues of development, as they assess how the United Arab Emirates has developed. In contrast, they will explore and investigate the issue of conflict within the region. Through the lens of conflict, they will be able to explain why Yemen is the poorest country in the Middle East, and investigate some of the main forces causing a wider conflict within the region, and outline how this has affected its population and its impact on the wider world.

Mastery Achievables

How connected are we to the rest of the world?

Students will further explore the concept of development within this unit. Firstly, students will examine and investigate whether there is a north-south divide between the level of development of countries, by critically evaluating whether the Brandt Line is still relevant in the 21st Century as a geographical theory.

Following on from this, students will then explore the causes of uneven development and will be able to categorise countries into different development groups such as HICs, NEEs and LICs. When studying the development gap, students will assess how historical, physical and environmental factors have intensified the development gap between HICs and LICs. Furthermore, they will be able to suggest that regional disparities of development also exist within countries, whilst being able to give reasons to explain why the development of countries varies globally. In addition to this, the role of Trans National Companies (TNCs) such as Primark will be examined with students investigating why they located their manufacturing and headquarter operations abroad in different continents such as Asia. Here students will be able to suggest both the benefits and burdens for both the origin and host countries of TNCs.

Finally, students will be able to describe different approaches as to how the development gap is being reduced, by assessing how sustainable they are. These approaches will include students being able to evaluate how banana farmers within LICs and NEEs are being supported via the Fair Trade scheme, and by the end of this unit, they will have a greater awareness of the concept of sustainability.

Can we ever know enough about volcanoes?

During this unit students will be able to tell the difference between natural disasters and natural hazards and be able to sort natural hazards as either an atmospheric, geological or geomorphological (flooding) hazard. They will be aware of Wegner’s theory of continental drift and Pangea, whilst also be able to identify and describe the Earth’s layers and their key characteristics. Students will be able to locate and describe the global distribution of volcanoes, earthquakes and plate boundaries, and recognise which plate boundaries volcanoes happen at. They will study the different states for a volcano of dormant, active and extinct and there are different types of volcanoes e.g. Composite and shield. Students therefore will examine the structure and anatomy of a volcano, and will be able to compare the characteristics of a composite volcano versus a shield volcano. A case study of a volcanic eruption will be studied, with students being able to suggest causes and effects of this said event. Finally students will be aware of why people decide to live with the risk of volcanic eruptions and how this risk can be effectively managed.

Mastery Achievables

Can we ever know enough about Earthquakes?

By the end of this unit students will be able to define what an earthquake is, where they are distributed and which specific plate boundary they are associated with. They will also know what the key features of an earthquake are and be able to identify both the primary and secondary effects and immediate and long term responses for an earthquake from two countries of contrasting levels of development. Students will be able to compare the effects and responses of earthquakes from two countries at differing levels of development and determine what factors other than wealth influence the impacts and responses of earthquakes. They will know the different ways in which the risks associated with earthquakes can be reduced.

Are weather hazards becoming more extreme?

Students will be able to define what an atmospheric hazard is and give different examples. They will explore how the world’s global atmospheric circulation provides the climatic conditions needed for the world’s biomes. They will know what a tropical storm is and be able to accurately describe their location of where they form using global locational and place specific knowledge. They will also be able to explain the conditions needed for tropical storms to form, what their key features are and know what the different regional names used for tropical storms are and which parts of the world these regional names correspond too. Students will draw upon their prior knowledge of the causes of climate change and will be able to outline how climate change may affect tropical storms in the future. They will have studied a tropical storm in a LIC and will be able to identify both its primary and secondary effects and immediate and long term responses. Finally, students will be able to compare the impacts and responses of a tropical storm to that of an extreme weather event in a HIC.

Mastery Achievables

The First World War

Students will study how the world became opposing camps in the period before 1914 and how this rivalry and fear led to a conflict that would eventually kill between 15 to 20 million people in the space of four years. The focus of the unit is for students is not only the reasons for the war but the impact the war would have on all sections of society and the positive and negative effects the war brought about. By the end of the unit, students will also start to consider the long-term effects that the war and its peace would have for the world and potential global conflict.

This unit of work will give students the opportunity to consider the different social and political changes that the conflict brought about through nations fighting a mechanised war for the first time. Students will evaluate key events and battles of the war and justify the reasons for such battles. They will also evaluate the changing nature of warfare between 1914-1918. Students will think about how our modern day social and political lives are linked to the events of World War One. Students will see how the ‘War to end all wars’ became an important factor in creating the perfect atmosphere for another global conflict within the space of 20 years.

This part of history is incredibly important as it saw most of the world and their empires divided into two armed camps. The Triple Entente of Britain, France and Russia against the Central Powers of Germany and the Austro-Hungarian Empire. During the four years of war, more countries would join the conflict that would make it a truly global conflict. The First World War saw massive social change in relation to women’s suffrage and the break-down of the old social order. Empires crumbled under the pressure that total war brought about. The map of the world and Europe especially was redrawn due to new countries being formed at the end of the war. The peace treaties that followed the end of the war hoped to end future conflict, however students will be able to discuss how important the end of World War One was in creating future conflict.

Inter War Years

Students will study the key events and individuals of the 20 years preceding World War One. This unit continues from the last one in chronological order for students to understand the complex reasons for the causes of World War Two. Students will study each key event and individual and explain the importance they played in creating the situation for war. Students will also be able to link the numerous causes of World War Two together.

This part of history is important as it is still within the consciousness of the older generations. It also shapes the world for the future global conflict that would become the Second World War. The events of the 1920’s and 1930’s has shaped political and economic thought ever since. Government intervention in time of economic crisis changed due to the Great Depression. Government and global institutions inability to stand up to the dictatorships not only caused the war but changed how they would act towards aggression post-1945.

Mastery Achievables

World War II

Students will study the key events of the most tumultuous event in modern world history. This unit has continued from the previous unit that looked at the inter war years of 1919-1939. Students will be taught about the key events and battles of the war and their importance in the outcome of the global conflict. Students will be able to articulate when the war turned from one of loss for the allied powers to one of victory. Students will also assess the moral dilemma that fighting a total war on this scale brought about.

This part of history is important as not only are there still people who experienced the conflict, but its impact has a direct impact on our lives today. The damage brought about new planning in British towns and the war also brought about the introduction of the Welfare State and the birth of the NHS. Britain could no longer hold on to its empire after the war and a new relationship with its former colonies appeared through the commonwealth. The war saw the rise of the superpower in the shape of the USA and the Soviet Union and the first use of nuclear weapons, a threat that still hangs over the world today. Also, the conflict saw the introduction of the United Nations and the Human Rights Charter. The European Union was also born out of the devastation of Europe, institutions that still play their role today.

The Holocaust

Students will study the key events of the biggest state sponsored mass murder in history. They will understand the historical reasoning for anti-Semitism within Europe and Germany. The students will focus on the key events that led from persecution to extermination. Students will suggest the key turning points from 1933 to 1945.

The unit is important to study for students in order to understand how persecuting ‘out’ groups can easily lead to severe consequences. Students will make links to modern examples of persecution and genocide such as Rwanda and Bosnia.

Mastery Achievables

Nazi Germany

Students will study the key events of the rise of Hitler and the Nazi Party. The unit closely links to the previous unit. Students will gain an understanding of the political situation that Germany found itself in after World War I. They will assess the factors that allowed a provincial extremist political party rise to supremacy in Germany by 1933. They will also judge the key events that allowed the Nazi Party to consolidate its power that took Adolf Hitler from Chancellor to dictator within two years of taking power. Students will finally understand life under the Nazi’s from 1933-1939. They will look at the experiences of women, children and workers and the Nazi policies that governed them. Students will also understand the Nazi’s beliefs on other ‘out’ groups that did not fit into their idea of the nation. Finally, students will analyse the effectiveness of Nazi economic policy. Was it an effective totalitarian regime? This unit is important to study as it links together the causes and events of World War II and allows students to understand the dangers that democracies face and the need for freedoms that are denied in dictatorships.

Mastery Achievables

In the autumn term of Year 9, students discuss after school activities, a range of celebrations, clothing and fashion, earning money and future plans.

Mastery Achievables

Students begin the spring term learning to discuss different genres of music and expressing their personal preferences and tastes, and how they have changed over time. They go on to compare, and give opinions about, their secondary and primary education experiences.

Mastery Achievables

In the summer term, students discuss food and eating habits in more detail. They go on to learn about the natural world, environmental issues, French speaking countries, famous French world sites and attractions.

Mastery Achievables

Invasion Games

To further, develop knowledge and understanding of advanced skills, techniques, rules and regulations of all activities and apply them in competitive situations.

Apply advanced skills in long-range passing, shooting, footwork, turning, dribbling and ball control in competitive situations.

Develop and demonstrate a clear knowledge and understanding of advanced attacking and defending tactics in competitive situations.

Gymnastics

To use creativity to develop/ choreograph routines and sequences whilst demonstrating an understanding of aesthetics in performance.

To develop sequences based on flight using different parts of the body, level and speed working both independently and in groups.

To use vaulting equipment safety in order to develop a variety of vaults from the buck to the box (head and hand springs).

Mastery Achievables

Netball

To further, develop knowledge and understanding of advanced skills, techniques, rules and regulations of all activities and apply them in competitive situations.

Apply the advanced skills of serving, forehand and backhand in competitive situations.

Develop knowledge and understanding of advanced skills and techniques including slice and spin.

Apply knowledge and understanding of advanced tactics and positional play in competitive situations.

Health-related Fitness

To further, develop knowledge and understanding of the components of fitness by identifying – aerobic endurance, speed, strength, muscular endurance, agility, co-ordination, and flexibility.

To understand how to adapt your own training within PE to meet the demands of your individual sport.

To develop knowledge and understanding of diet and nutrition.

Mastery Achievables

Striking and Fielding

To further, develop knowledge and understanding of advanced skills, techniques, rules and regulations of all activities and apply them in competitive situations.

Apply advanced skills of fielding, throwing, catching, batting and bowling in competitive situations.

Develop knowledge and understanding of advanced skills and techniques.

Apply knowledge and understanding of basic tactics and positional play (fielding and directional hitting).

Athletics

To further, develop knowledge and understanding of advanced skills, techniques, rules and regulations of all activities and apply them in competitive situations.

Develop performance of the advanced techniques in sprinting, long-distance running, throwing and jumping events.

Apply knowledge and understanding of the factors that affect performance in these events in competition.

Mastery Achievables

What has religion done for us?

The aim of this topic is to enable students to be mindful of the motivations, risks and underlying themes of modern culture. The value of this particular unit is great both inside and outside of the classroom. The questioning skills of students up to this point will be of use but also will be built upon when questioning aspects of their own lives which they may have never before thought to question. A focus on social media within this topic also gives students the tools to question what they see on the internet and what is being put in front of them on a daily basis.

Mastery Achievables

Should humans play God? In this topic we will discuss and debate whether humans should play God by focusing on a number of moral and ethical issues that exist in our world today.

Mastery Achievables

Identify and challenge prejudice and discrimination. This has a real relevance for our students as it focuses on situations/moral dilemmas that students might have faced or may face in future. Through this module we continue to build our students skills and tools to deal with challenging situations/views and also aim to direct our students’ moral compasses so that they feel comfortable engaging in challenging discussions in future.

Mastery Achievables

Students will undertake Investigation, use primary and secondary data including writing a design brief and specification.

Students will learn about sustainability and the environment

Students will look at the work of others such as Phillippe Starck, Norman Foster, Coco Chanel, Jonathan Ive, Zaha Hadid, Ruth E Carter, Fenty, Andrew Ritchie (Brompton bike), Troika, Random International, IDEO and have access to alternative sources such as magazines and art journals.

Students will learn about the different design strategies including an introduction to the ‘iterative’ design process.

Students will further develop their communication of design ideas through drawing and modeling, selection of materials and components and know methods for measuring and understand the impact of tolerances.

Students will grow their competence and independence when producing a range of practical tasks and developing quality products through the use of materials.

Students will know the sources and origins of materials such as cellulose fibres.

Students will develop their skills using specialist tools and equipment and understand Industrial methods including one-off, batch, mass and continuous production.

Mastery Achievables

Students will learn how to Investigate and use primary and secondary data.

Students will understand sustainability and the environment.

Students will know how to select of ingredients and methods for measuring and/or weighing.

Students will have the ability to plan a sequence of tasks with timings and develop quality products through the use of a range of ingredients.

Students will grow their competence and independence when cooking a range of predominantly savoury dishes.

Students will know sources and origins of ingredients and develop their skills using specialist tools and equipment.

Students will understand industrial methods including primary/secondary processing

Students will have an introduction to Food Science terminology and application of knowledge e.g. honeycomb, caramelisation.

Mastery Achievables
Mathematics

Mathematics is a creative and highly inter-connected discipline that is essential to everyday life, critical to science, technology, and engineering, and necessary for financial literacy and most forms of employment. At Thistley Hough Academy, we provide a foundation for understanding the world, the ability to reason mathematically, an appreciation of the beauty and power of mathematics, and a sense of enjoyment and curiosity about the subject.

English

Students at Thistley Hough Academy study both English Language and Literature in following the AQA GCSE specifications.

The study of English Language prepares students to write analytically and in detail; develop critical reading skills; hone the skill of structuring a cohesive argument and become perceptive and sensitive communicators who are able to read and write with a high degree of technical accuracy.

English Literature develops students’ knowledge and skills in reading, writing and critical thinking.  It provides students with opportunities to read a range of texts in the genres of prose, poetry and drama.  Students are assessed on their ability to analyse and compare literary texts, explore ambiguity and read a range of different forms and genres by British writers.

Science

All students at Thistley Hough Academy study Biology, Chemistry and Physics in their Science lessons. As Science teachers, we aspire to fulfil our vision of “empowering students with the skills, curiosity and resilience for 21st Century life in our community.”

We strongly believe that the Science curriculum is more important than ever to develop young people for work in the near future, that will be defined by human interaction with technology and science.

We will achieve this through the use of both practical and theoretical lessons. The practical lessons will develop the pupil’s ability to explore the world around them, develop questions they may have about natural phenomena and design experiments to test their theories.

Theoretical lessons generally concentrate understanding on scientific concepts to underpin the practical lessons and the history of Scientific developments.

Art

The Art and Design Programme combines a conceptual framework with subject specific practical skills. As well as underpinning the teaching and learning of Art and Design, the Key Concepts, which drive the programme, explore the value and impact of Pattern, Structure, Meaning, Human Interaction, Performance and Practice.

Art and Design offers opportunities for students to develop their creativity, imagination and problem solving skills through visual, tactile and formal elements. Students develop techniques through experimenting with a wide range of media in response to the disciplines of Art, whilst developing practical, technical and critical skills, communicating their ideas, feelings and meanings in response to the work of artists and designers.

Geography

At Thistley Hough Academy, our students will understand what it is to be a Geographer. Students will have a curiosity in finding out about the world and its people. They will have developed a passion and commitment to the subject. Our students will have developed an excellent knowledge of where places are and what they are like. They will have an understanding of the ways in which places are interdependent and interconnected, and how human and physical environments are interrelated. Pupils will develop an understanding of the issues facing a diverse range of places and people now and in the future, including how we can become more sustainable to help support our ever changing world.

Our pupils will have an extensive core of geographical knowledge and vocabulary, and will be able to communicate this, in a variety of ways, routinely. They will have good spatial awareness, and be able to use a wide range of maps effectively to investigate places. They will be able to carry out increasingly complex, independent geographical enquiry, ask their own relevant questions, make sense of geographical data, think critically about different views and justify their own view in reaching conclusions.

History

History at Thistley Hough Academy, encourages students to think critically about a wide variety of historical questions and to develop a broad range of historical knowledge.

In years 7, 8 and 9 students study a range of topics that will provide a solid background for GCSE study.

History plays a key role in developing our students into confident, successful adults. History requires students to develop an enquiring, critical mind especially in response to causation and consequence in regard to historical events. History as a discipline is highly regarded within the academic field and workplace.

Modern Foreign Languages

At Thistley Hough Academy, our aim is to equip all learners of MFL with a strong foundation across the four skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking. With a good understanding of the basic grammar and structures of the language, together with a secure basic vocabulary for dealing with a variety of known and unknown contexts, learners are able to move on to the next stage of language study with increasing confidence and proficiency. Through the study of foreign languages, we endeavour to embed cultural appreciation of the people and countries where French and Spanish are spoken. Our five year programme of study aims to maximise the progress and success of every student, irrespective of their starting point in foreign language learning.

Physical Education

The primary purpose of Physical Education at Thistley Hough Academy is to develop in young people an understanding of the positive impact an active lifestyle will have on their lives. The developmentally appropriate curriculum also provides a unique learning environment where affective, psychomotor and cognitive skills can be developed. In addition, good health practices, teamwork, sportsmanship, self-control, communication, resilience, and the opportunity for positive social interaction with peers are encouraged. Using leadership opportunities, students will be able to further build on these skills and characteristics as well as improving confidence. Research clearly shows that the active, healthy child is more likely to be academically motivated and establish habits of behaviour that will promote lives that are models of wellness.

Relgious Education

Religious Education at Thistley Hough Academy, encourages students to think critically about a wide variety of religious, ethical and philosophical questions.

RE plays a key role in developing our students into caring, confident, successful adults. This means not only striving for the highest standards of academic success for all our students and equipping them with the key skills for further learning and the world of work, but also providing them with the opportunities to formulate their own sets of values and beliefs about the world we live in.

Business

OverLearners will study in GCSE (9-1) Business: Marketing, Recruitment, Business structures, Finance, Business operations and Influences on businesses.

OCR’s GCSE (9–1) in Business is an up-to-date and engaging qualification that is relevant to the world of business today. This qualification equips learners with the skills and confidence to explore how different business situations affect business decisions. It is a well-rounded introduction to the subject. The qualification will encourage learners to make informed choices about a wide range of further learning opportunities and career pathways as well as develop life skills that enable them to become financially and commercially aware.

Learners will be able to understand the business world which they will enter after finishing school/college/university. They will be able to make informed decisions and put forward arguments to persuade others, have the knowledge to help you set up a business of your own. Business can lead on to many vocational qualifications and is a good stepping stone in A Level subjects, especially economics, accountancy and of course A Level Business.

Creative iMedia

OCR Cambridge Nationals Creative iMedia is an inclusive, vocational qualification that appeals to a wide range of learners and allows flexibility through a mix of external assessments that allow the course to be tailored to the individual. The vast majority of optional units are engaging and prepare students for their next steps. The course contents prepares pupils for working in the media industry due to it use of industry standard techniques. These units assess the practical application of creative interactive media skills while challenging all learners, including high attaining learners.

These qualifications will assess the application of creative media skills through their practical use. They will provide learners with essential knowledge, transferable skills and tools to improve their learning in other subjects with the aims of enhancing their employability when they leave education, contributing to their personal development and future economic well-being. The qualifications will encourage independence, creativity and awareness of the digital media sector.

The Cambridge Nationals in Creative iMedia will equip learners with a range of creative media skills and provide opportunities to develop, in context, desirable, transferable skills such as research, planning, and review, working with others and communicating creative concepts effectively. Through the use of these skills, learners will ultimately be creating fit-for-purpose creative media products. The Cambridge Nationals in Creative iMedia will also challenge all learners, including high attaining learners, by introducing them to demanding material and techniques; encouraging independence and creativity and providing tasks that engage with the most taxing aspects of the National Curriculum.

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Practical Sport
Leading Sports Activities
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Mastery Achievables

Perimeter, area and volume

Through this unit of work, students will consolidate their knowledge of calculating perimeter and area of squares and rectangles and converting between units of measure. They will discover the formulae needed to calculate the area of parallelograms, triangles and trapezia and will be able to apply these to support students calculating surface area of 3D prisms. Students will develop their understanding of volume and capacity and the formulae needed to calculate these.

Ratio and proportion

In this unit pupils focus on writing ratios, using ratios, ratios and measures, comparing using ratios, using proportion and proportion on graphs.

Right angles triangles

In this unit students are both developing old skills and acquiring new skills. They are using their knowledge of substituting, rearranging formula and solving equations in a multi-step process to find lengths and angles in right-angled triangles. Students need to be fluent in their ability to manipulate equations and solve. Students are first exposed to Pythagoras and trigonometric functions in this topic and although they are not developed in the foundation tier to advanced trigonometry or right-angled triangles in 3D solids, they are sometimes embedded in more advances situations such as bearings, surface area/volume of a triangular prism, pyramids and cones. This topic is one that can be linked to many everyday situations and job roles such as considering the height of a ladder up a wall and the angle that it need to make, roofing and what angles are needed and angles of ramps to name a few examples.

Straight line graphs

In this unit pupils look at different types of graphs including straight line graphs, real-life graphs distance time graphs and rate of change graphs.

Mastery Achievables

Transformations

Through this unit, students will discover the four types of transformation, including translation, rotation, reflection and enlargement. Students will need these skills to identify line, rotational and planes of symmetry in 2D and 3D shapes. Students need to be able to combine transformations and describe using a single transformation. Students will need to be able to describe transformations fully, giving information relevant to the transformation.

Probability

In this unit pupils work on calculating probability and using different diagrams to support this including sample space, frequency tree, Venn diagrams and tree diagrams. This unit consolidates work completed at KS3 and pupils use fractions, decimals and percentages in a different context.  Pupils can progress onto more set notation and set theory as well as conditional probability.

Multiplicative reasoning

During this unit pupils explore percentages more by calculating reverse percentages and calculating percentage change. This then progresses onto compound interest where pupils extend their knowledge of multipliers.  Pupils explore different compound measures as well as calculating speed, distance and time.  Pupils then move onto direct in and inverse proportion.

Quadratic equations and graphs

This unit of work looks in depth into quadratic equations. In this unit students will learn how to expand double brackets, plot quadratic graphs find solutions to quadratics graphically and solve by factorising. Students will need these skills in later units when looking a draw cubic graphs and solving simultaneous equations.

Mastery Achievables

Loci, bearings and constructions

Through this unit, students will discover the concept of loci and use their prior knowledge of transformations to identify planes of symmetry. Students will further develop their knowledge of angles properties to include bearings and be able to construct angle and perpendicular bisectors. They will focus on precision and accuracy with constructions.

Perimeter, area and volume 2

Through this unit of work, students will consolidate their knowledge of calculating perimeter and area of squares and rectangles and converting between units of measure. They will discover the formulae needed to calculate the area and circumference of circles and will be able to apply this to calculating arc length, perimeter and area of sectors of circles. Students will develop their understanding of volume and surface area of 3D shapes and the formulae needed to calculate these.

Mastery Achievables

LITERATURE: C19th Century Text. ‘A Christmas Carol’

Written in 1843, A Christmas Carol presented the fundamentals of Christmas celebrations that are widely recognised today. Through the teaching of the text it gives students a cultural insight to the festival. Scrooge’s character represents key morals and the opportunity of redemption and change.

Dickens view on society of the time period is reflected through the text, it shows students an importance of shared social responsibility and inequality within social classes.

It helps students to understand the key parts of history such as the Industrial Revolution creating a separated social environment between poor and rich.

Through the change that is displayed in the antagonist Ebenezer Scrooge students can plot the characterisation of him throughout the text and consider Dickens’ social intentions towards the rich through how linguistically this is displayed. The allegorical and symbolic meaning of this text is universal and profound allowing a deep literary analysis taking into account the concept of political and social ethics at the time. Motifs and symbolic representations are commonplace in the novella allowing students to enjoy and evaluate Dickens rich language choices.

LANGUAGE: Creative writing and fiction reading

This unit seeks to develop students’ reading skills and writing skills from those demonstrated at KS3.  It is taught explicitly and complements the English Literature course provision.  English Language paper 1 Section A reading skills are enhanced by using extracts from a variety of novels as stimulus. This is a proven, successful method for encouraging students to transfer their ability to analyse language used in creative texts, as extracts from English Language Paper 1 are almost exclusively drawn from literary works.

English Language paper 1 writing skills are developed across KS3 writing a variety of pieces of creative or narrative writing, as well as ‘Big-Write’ lessons in year 7.  Moreover, as students progress through Key Stage 3, they will be required to study the craft of the writer for both their English Language and English Literature courses as well as learning how to develop their own creative writing through their appreciation of a wide range of literary/creative texts.  Students will use what they have learned about the craft of a writer in order to develop their own creative writing skills.  They will also be taught the difference between creative and narrative writing.

Mastery Achievables

LITERATURE: Shakespeare Play ‘Macbeth’

Macbeth has long been lauded as one of Shakespeare’s most iconic plays. For their compulsory Shakespeare component, students will study the play in-depth looking at language, character development, themes, motifs, language use and structure, linking these ideas to Shakespeare’s intentions and key contextual factors from the Jacobean period.

Macbeth tells the story of an overly ambitious protagonist who is lead to his downfall by a collection of witches and his own ‘vaulting’ ambition. With its exciting mix of the supernatural and natural worlds, Macbeth is a deeply engaging play with a relatable main character who is frustrating in his mix of nobility and ultimately inner evil nature.

The character of Lady Macbeth allows students to explore the role of women in the Jacobean period and the consequences of the subversion of the natural order. Together these key ideas make Macbeth intriguing and highly engaging to students. With its common thematic links to other Shakespearean works through the genre of tragedy it also provides an ideal platform for further study of English Literature at the level of further or higher education.

LANGUAGE: Transactional writing and non-fiction reading

Students will read a range of non-fiction extracts, these will continue with the theme of gothic horror.  Students will also develop their understanding and ability to analyse how writers use various methods of creating meaning.  They will also consider why and how an author might make language choices and how they convey their ideas throughout a text.

They will also have considered the features of writing to argue and persuade by learning how to write a newspaper article.

Mastery Achievables

LITERATURE: Modern Prose or Play ‘An Inspector Calls’.

Priestley wrote ‘An Inspector Calls’ in 1945 post WW2 but set it in 1912 allowing him to have a clear and accurate reflection of society and social groups. He understood the mistreatment based on class structure which he attempts to challenge in his play.

It allows students to have an in-depth knowledge of history, politics and society with ideas that are still relevant today. Within the context teaching, students will learn how individuals have impacted society through pressure placed on the government to create change such as the Commonwealth party. This applies to modern day life where activists are trying to create a changed society for misrepresented groups.

The themes the play covers, teaches students valuable life lessons and responsibility on their personal morals, giving them a sense of community which they can apply within their school community and through life.

Concepts of age and gender shows students the relevance of continuous change and equality which will encourage them towards wider reading and help them understand the struggles of different groups of people.

At A level Literature studies, students will look at post war texts and this play will prepare them for themes and ideas relating to social, political, personal and literary legacies.

LANGUAGE: Speaking and Listening

Pupils will extend their knowledge of Lang paper 2 Section B and Spoken Word task.  They will be able to understand and use the requirements of the exam criteria to be able to produce an evaluative, written response.

To become a confident and self-assured individual, students need to develop their ability to speak publicly and listen.  Students will be given time to prepare and plan for their Speaking and Listening topic based on their own personal choice.  These will be assessed, and recorded, on an individual level by an English teacher.  The students will be required to speak, with confidence and clarity, on a topic of their personal choice.  They will be required to produce an engaging presentation and be able to answer questions from their teacher.

Students will also develop their writing skills to promote a point of view (Language p2 Section B).  They will learn how to produce transactional writing.

Mastery Achievables

Biology: Bioenergetics

Students will study the main processes that underpin life as we know it. This will include building on the work started in year 8 on photosynthesis, with greater detail being studied in controlling the rate of the process as well as plant uses of glucose. In addition, three types of respiration are studied in detail: aerobic respiration, anaerobic respiration and fermentation. The process of metabolism is also studied in this topic.

Chemistry: Chemical Changes & Quantitative Chemistry

Within chemical changes students will study some of the most important chemical reactions and processes used by chemists. This includes acid base reactions, creating salts and displacement reactions. In quantitative chemistry pupils will use their mathematical skills to quantify various aspects of chemistry, including calculating the percentage yield and atom economy of chemical reactions.

Physics: Waves

In the study of waves, students will again build on their knowledge from year 7 and 8 to study in more detail the properties of waves. This will include a detailed study of refraction and reflection and the composition of ray diagrams. The uses of waves will also be studied including using ultrasound in pregnancy to monitor the growth of a foetus.

Mastery Achievables

Biology: Homeostasis and Response

Within this topic students will study both the nervous and endocrine system in humans. Within the nervous system they will explore reflex actions, as well as some students exploring the structure of the brain and eye. As part of the endocrine system, students will discover how hormones control many aspects of their body, including blood glucose levels, kidney function and human reproduction.

Chemistry: Energy Changes & The rate and extent of chemical change

Within energy changes students will investigate how a chemical reaction will determine whether heat is transferred in to, or out of a reaction, this work will lead on to looking at everyday applications of this knowledge. As part of the rate and extent of chemical change topic, students will study how changing the conditions of a chemical reaction will affect the rate of product being formed.

Physics: Electricity

Students will build on their year 8 work on electricity to explore electrical circuits in more detail. Students will have to perform additional calculations on current, potential difference and charge as well investigate the relationships between these factors. In the later part of the unit students will study mains electricity, alternating current and electrical safety devices in our homes.

Mastery Achievables

Biology: Ecology

In this topic students will explore organisms in their environment. Firstly, students will investigate the interactions between a living organism and its environment, including competition between species of animals and plants. Students will then move on to looking at feed relationships in an eco-system and linking to this to the carbon cycle. Finally, the students will study the human impact on global biodiversity including methods to limit our impact on the global eco-system.

Chemistry: Organic Chemistry

Within this topic students will study the composition of hydrocarbons and their everyday uses outside of a laboratory. This will include an in-depth study of how to separate hydrocarbons from crude oil and how larger hydrocarbons can be split to make smaller, more useful, products.

Physics: Forces

This unit covers a wide range of topics connected to forces within physics. Initially students will develop their understanding of speed, as studied in year 7, to explore the concepts of velocity and acceleration. The students will then move on to study of ow forces are linked to acceleration and investigate the mathematical relationships between moving objects and the forces they exert. Finally, students will work on pressure within systems, including atmospheric pressure and pressure within liquids.

Mastery Achievables

Observational drawing form selected secondary sources.

Extended and experimental observational drawing form selected secondary sources and critical annotation.

Mastery Achievables

Contextual and contemporary connections and artist research.

Design development and refinement of ideas and critical annotation.

Mastery Achievables

Experimentation and material testing.

Mastery Achievables

How is our climate changing?

By the end of this unit students will be able to identify and explain both the human and physical causes of climate change along with the effects and responses to climate change at both a local, national and global level. They will be able to outline what is the recent evidence for climate change and how the effects can be managed via mitigation and adaptation methods.

What are Ecosystems and Biomes?

Students will be able to distinguish between an ecosystem and a biome and identify the components of a small-scale ecosystem, food chain and food web. They will also be able to identify and classify changes to ecosystems as either natural or human induced and describe the impact these changes have on ecosystems. Students will also explore the global distribution of biomes and reasons for their distinctive climatic conditions and flora.

Why do we need Tropical Rainforests?

Students will be able to locate tropical rainforests onto maps and describe their location using locational and place specific knowledge e.g. directional language and lines of latitude and longitude. They will know what the climatic conditions of a tropical rainforest are; whilst also being able to explain how and why tropical rainforests are being threatened through deforestation, how they are being sustainably managed and why they are important on a local, national and global level.

What are the opportunities and challenges facing cold environments?

By the end of this topic students will be able to locate cold environments onto maps and describe their location using locational and place specific knowledge e.g. directional language and lines of latitude and longitude. They will know what the climatic conditions of a cold environment are. Students will be able to explain how and why cold environments such as Svalbard, Norway are being threatened via mining, fishing, energy development and tourism and the challenges these opportunities present for Svalbard. They will also explore how cold environments are being sustainably managed and why they are important on a local, national and global level.

Mastery Achievables

How is the UK’s coastline changing?

Students will further build upon their prior knowledge of coasts from KS3 by exploring how coasts are shaped by a range of physical processes from the different types of erosion, weathering and mass movement, to transportation and deposition. They will be able to articulate why some coastlines are more vulnerable to erosion and mass movement than others. They will also be to explain the formation of wider range of erosional landforms including headland and bays, wave cut-notches and platforms, caves, arches, stacks and stumps; whilst also being able to explain the formation of a wider range of key depositional landforms, including beaches, sand dunes and tombolos. Students will be able to identify the different management strategies that can be used to protect the coastlines from the effects of physical processes and evaluate their effectiveness in relation to the coastal management scheme of Lyme Regis.

How do the rivers shape the land?

By the end of this unit students will have further built upon their existing knowledge of the hydrosphere and causes of flooding, by exploring upland areas and river systems. They will be able to identify the shape of the river valley as it changes downstream and the fluvial processes that affect it. Students will know and be able to explain how the distinctive fluvial landforms are formed at each course, using the River Tees as an example. They will know the different management strategies that can be used to protect river landscapes from the effects of flooding, and be able to compare, contrast and evaluate the effectiveness of both soft and hard engineering strategies; whilst also further their understanding of how human and physical factors can affect the flood risk. Finally, students will understand what a flood hydrograph shows and how to interpret them; to show the relationship between precipitation and discharge, and they will have explored a flood management strategy in Banbury, Oxfordshire, UK.

What is urbanisation?

By the end of this unit students will be able to identify the global pattern of urban change and the factors that affect the rate of urbanisation in both HIC’s and LIC’s or NEE’s. They will explore in depth how urban growth has affected the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; what challenges this has created and how its government both at a local and national level has tackled these urban challenges.

Mastery Achievables

How is the UK’s Urban Landscape changing?

Students will investigate the city of Liverpool, UK from a HIC and understand how it has been affected by urban growth and urban decline. They will explore the key urban challenges the city has faced in the last 50 years and be able to outline how the city has tackled these urban challenges working with different agencies and government at all scales; giving examples of urban planning and regeneration utilised within Liverpool.

Fieldwork Write up

At the end of the fieldwork process, students will have completed both their human and physical fieldwork enquires. They will have investigated the effects of regeneration on the city of Liverpool and whether human intervention has affected the River Alyn’s characteristics. They will have further developed their ability to conduct a geographical enquiry through having asked geographical questions, having made geographical decisions and having made geographical conclusions. They will have developed their ability to identify risks associated with their fieldwork enquiries, how to minimise said risks, how to apply appropriate data collection methods to accurately record their data, and how best to present their findings to enable them to effectively analyse their results and make geographical conclusions.

Mastery Achievables

Nazi Germany

The Nazi Germany unit is from Paper 3 of the Edexcel GCSE course. It makes up 30% of the course.

Students will continue to study the key events of the rise of Hitler and the Nazi Party. The unit closely links to the previous unit. Students will gain an understanding of the political situation that Germany found itself in after World War I. They will assess the factors that allowed a provincial extremist political party rise to supremacy in Germany by 1933. They will also judge the key events that allowed the Nazi Party to consolidate its power that took Adolf Hitler from Chancellor to dictator within two years of taking power. Students will finally understand life under the Nazi’s from 1933-1939. They will look at the experiences of women, children and workers and the Nazi policies that governed them. Students will also understand the Nazi’s beliefs on other ‘out’ groups that did not fit into their idea of the nation. Finally, students will analyse the effectiveness of Nazi economic policy. Was it an effective totalitarian regime? This unit is important to study as it links together the causes and events of World War II and allows students to understand the dangers that democracies face and the need for freedoms that are denied in dictatorships.

Mastery Achievables

Crime and Punishment

The Crime and Punishment unit is from paper 1 of the Edexcel GCSE course. It makes up 30% of the course.

Students should understand how key features in the development of crime and punishment were linked with the key features of society in Britain in the periods studied. They will be able to develop an understanding of the nature and process of change. This will involve understanding patterns of change, trends and turning points, and the influence of factors inhibiting or encouraging change such as attitudes in society; individuals and institutions (Church and government); and science and technology. They will also understand how factors worked together to bring about particular developments at particular times.

Students will study the changes in crime and punishment over time from c1000 to the present day and looking at the nature and changing definitions of criminal activity in crimes against the person, property, and authority. Students will understand the nature of law enforcement and punishment and the role of the authorities and local communities had in law enforcement in the particular time period. For example, they study the role of the Church in Medieval law and order and the changes in the death penalty after high profile cases such as Derek Bentley in 1953. The role of individuals will be analysed in relation to their importance within the crime and punishment area. For example, Matthew Hopkins, the Witchfinder General and Elizabeth Fry with prison reform. Finally, students will focus on Whitechapel c1870–c1900 and the issues surrounding crime, policing and the inner- city social problems of housing and overcrowding. Students will be able to understand the issues with policing within crowded city areas especially surrounding the Whitechapel murders of 1888.

This unit is important as it covers the last thousand years of history and students will be able to link the topic with areas taught in Key Stage 3. It allows students to understand how our modern system on law and order has developed over time and will allow students to study further especially within subjects such as law, public services and history.

Mastery Achievables

Crime and Punishment

The Crime and Punishment unit is from paper 1 of the Edexcel GCSE course. It makes up 30% of the course.

Students should understand how key features in the development of crime and punishment were linked with the key features of society in Britain in the periods studied. They will be able to develop an understanding of the nature and process of change. This will involve understanding patterns of change, trends and turning points, and the influence of factors inhibiting or encouraging change such as attitudes in society; individuals and institutions (Church and government); and science and technology. They will also understand how factors worked together to bring about particular developments at particular times.

Students will study the changes in crime and punishment over time from c1000 to the present day and looking at the nature and changing definitions of criminal activity in crimes against the person, property, and authority. Students will understand the nature of law enforcement and punishment and the role of the authorities and local communities had in law enforcement in the particular time period. For example, they study the role of the Church in Medieval law and order and the changes in the death penalty after high profile cases such as Derek Bentley in 1953. The role of individuals will be analysed in relation to their importance within the crime and punishment area. For example, Matthew Hopkins, the Witchfinder General and Elizabeth Fry with prison reform. Finally, students will focus on Whitechapel c1870–c1900 and the issues surrounding crime, policing and the inner- city social problems of housing and overcrowding. Students will be able to understand the issues with policing within crowded city areas especially surrounding the Whitechapel murders of 1888.

This unit is important as it covers the last thousand years of history and students will be able to link the topic with areas taught in Key Stage 3. It allows students to understand how our modern system on law and order has developed over time and will allow students to study further especially within subjects such as law, public services and history.

Mastery Achievables

Students begin the GCSE course talking about what they do during their holidays and in different types of weather. They give accounts of past holidays and talk about holidays they would like to go on in the future. In the second half of the first term, students go on to describe school life, including rules and pressures, expressing opinions about school subjects and extra-curricular activities.

Mastery Achievables

In the spring term, students talk about their use of technology and social media, describe family and friends and discuss their relationships with them.

Mastery Achievables

In the summer term, students describe how they spend money and talk about social activities such as the theatre and cinema, and following celebrities. They finish the year describing their local area and discussing what there is to do there.

Mastery Achievables

A – understand the rules, regulations and scoring systems for selected sports
B – practically demonstrate skills, techniques and tactics in selected sports
C – be able to review sports performance.

 

  • Performance and evaluation and analysis
  • Understanding rules and regulation.
  • Understand skills techniques and tactics (chosen sport)
Mastery Achievables

A – know the attributes associated with successful sports leadership
B – undertake the planning and leading of sports activities
C – review the planning and leading of sports activities.

 

  • Attributes of successful leadership
  • Planning & leading
  • Reviewing leadership
  • Target setting
Mastery Achievables
Mastery Achievables

Half term one – Christianity beliefs and teachings. Half term two – Christianity practices.

In a world in which religion has played, and continues to play, such a significant role, the value of learning about it is as great as ever. Understanding the dramatic story of Christianity over the past 2000 years and the vitality and malleability with which it exists in the modern world are essential to understanding our past, present and future. The influence of Christian beliefs underpins the GCSE scheme as we always see why things are as they are and analyse and question the origins of beliefs and ideas.

Mastery Achievables

Half term one- Theme B; Religion and life.

Students will study religious teachings, and religious, philosophical and ethical arguments, relating to the issues that follow, and their impact and influence in the modern world. They should be aware of contrasting perspectives in contemporary British society on all of these issues in order to judge the value of these for everyday life today and the value of these views to different people. They must be able to explain contrasting beliefs on the following three issues with reference to the main religious tradition in Britain (Christianity) and Islam: Abortion, Euthanasia and Animal experimentation. These are controversial issues in today’s world and students will be involved in discussion and debate around these both inside and outside school.

Half term two- Islam beliefs and teachings.

This topic area allows for a comprehensive understanding of the beliefs and teachings within Islam. Students will discover how the core beliefs of this religion are intrinsic to a Muslims life today and analyse the key teachings that these beliefs are based on. We will uncover beliefs and ultimate questions like the very nature of God and the mystery of life after death. Although this course of study forms a key part of the GCSE program the value of this goes way beyond that. Students will gain a deeper understanding of the Muslim faith and understand thoughts and teachings from centuries ago whilst still seeing their relevance today. We want students to leave us as global citizens and a comprehensive understanding of Islam allows them to engage in key debates around this religion with respect and tolerance of different beliefs and teachings.

Mastery Achievables

Half term one- Islam practices.

The purpose of this scheme of learning is to give students an in depth knowledge of key Islamic practices and the lifestyle of Muslims in modern day Britain and across the world. This is significant as it continues on from the beliefs and teachings in Islam to give students a comprehensive knowledge of what constitutes a Muslims life. The significant concept in this scheme is the influence of religious belief on lifestyle. I want students to remember what significant aspects come together to show the Muslim faith in everyday life.

Half term two- Theme A; Relationships and families.

Theme A Relationships and families conclude the learning journey in this phase. We finish with this topic area as students’ progress greatly benefits from the discussion and debating of these sensitive issues. The reasoning behind this is that students use skills that have been developed up to this point to apply to these issues and continue their rapid progress with the most beneficial approach to this topic area. Students will be challenged with questions about belief, values, meaning, purpose and truth, enabling them to develop their own attitudes towards religious issues. The influence of religion underpins the GCSE scheme as we always see why things are as they are and analyse and question the origins of beliefs and ideas.

Mastery Achievables

Core Course Topics:

  • Business 1(01)
  • Business activity
  • Marketing
  • People

This component introduces learners to business concepts and issues concerning the activities of a business. It explores the purpose and role of a business from first spotting an enterprising opportunity through to the growth of an established business. It takes a closer look at the role of marketing and human resources.

There are three sections covering content – section 1: business activity, section 2: marketing and section 3: people. Content from these three sections will be assessed in component 01. Throughout this component learners will need to consider how different contexts affect business decisions.

This component will support spotting an opportunity, developing an idea for a business, satisfying the needs of customers, identifying and understanding customer needs, Interpretation of market data, importance of effective communication, ways of communicating in a business context, CV, application form, letter of application, interviews, tests, group activities, references.

Mastery Achievables

Core Course Topics:

  • Business 2
  • Operations
  • Finance
  • Influences on Business

(Note: The interdependent nature of business is taught throughout the curriculum)

This component takes a closer look at the role of operations and finance and introduces learners to external influences on business. It explores the importance of these influences and how businesses change in response to them. Finally, learners will use content from both component 01 and component 02 to make connections between different elements of the subject.

There are four sections covering content – section 4: operations, section 5: finance, section 6: influences on business and section 7: the interdependent nature of business. Content from all these sections will be assessed in component 02. Learners will also be required to draw on content from Business 1: business activity, marketing and human resources to answer synoptic questions in section B of the component 02 examination. Throughout this component learners will need to consider how different contexts affect business decisions.

This component will help learners understand how to gain and retain customers , understand e-commerce to gain and retain customers and the use of financial information in measuring and understanding business performance and decision making.

Mastery Achievables

Core Course Topics:

  • Revision/Recap Business 1 and Business 2
  • Examination

Learners introduced to a range of revision techniques and examination practice questions. Learners asked to ‘Think about it’. These features are a prompt for learners to pause their reading revision. This will help to develop learners to develop their understanding by considering what would happen in a given situation. Learners asked to ‘Check their understanding’. These activities will help learners to each topic in an interactive way. Learners will asked to ‘Test themselves’. These short, knowledge-based questions provide the first step in testing their learning.

Learners provided with ‘Exam tips’. These expert tips throughout the module and help learners to polish their exam technique in order to maximise marks in the exam. Learners provided with ‘Exam practice’. Practice exam questions provided for each topic. This will help learners to consolidate their revision and practise exam skills. Learners provided with ‘key words’. These are clear, concise definitions of essential key terms throughout the module.

Mastery Achievables

Core Course Topics:

  • LO1 LO2 Pre-Production
  • LO3 LO4 Pre-Production

By the end of the year learners will understand pre-production skills used in the creative and digital media sector. It will develop their understanding of the client brief, time frames, deadlines and preparation techniques that form part of the planning and creation process. Planning is an essential part of working in the creative and digital media sector. This unit will enable learners to acquire the underpinning knowledge and skills needed to create digital media products and gain an understanding of their application. On completion of this year, learners will understand the purpose and uses of a range of pre-production techniques.

They will be able to plan pre-production of a creative digital media product to a client brief and will understand how to review pre-production documents. Learners studying the optional units will be able to apply knowledge and understanding gained in this unit to help develop their skills further during the completion of those units.

Mastery Achievables

Core Course Topics:

  • LO1 LO2 Digital Graphics
  • LO3 LO4 Digital Graphics

By the end of the year learners will be able to apply the skills, knowledge and understanding gained in that unit and vice versa. The aim of this year is for learners to understand the basics of digital graphics editing for the creative and digital media sector. They will learn where and why digital graphics are used and what techniques are involved in their creation.

This unit will develop learners’ understanding of the client brief, time frames, deadlines and preparation techniques as part of the planning and creation process. On completion of this year, learners will understand the purpose and properties of digital graphics and know where and how they are used. They will be able to plan the creation of digital graphics, create new digital graphics using a range of editing techniques and review a completed graphic against a specific brief.

Mastery Achievables

Core Course Topics:

  • Option Unit 1 LO1 LO2 Creating a multipage website
  • Option Unit 1 LO1 LO2 Creating a multipage website

This unit builds on units R081 (Pre-Production Skills) and R082 (Digital Graphics) and learners will be able to apply skills, knowledge and understanding gained in those units.

Multipage websites are the basis of internet content and are therefore used extensively in the creative digital media sector, whether for mobile phones or computers in all their forms.
This unit will enable learners to understand the basics of creating multipage websites. It will enable learners to demonstrate their creativity by combining components to create a functional, intuitive and aesthetically pleasing website. It will allow them to interpret a client brief and to use planning and preparation techniques when developing a multipage website.

On completion of this unit, learners will be able to explore and understand the different properties, purposes and features of multipage websites, plan and create a multipage website and review the final website against a specific brief.

Mathematics

Mathematics is a creative and highly inter-connected discipline that is essential to everyday life, critical to science, technology, and engineering, and necessary for financial literacy and most forms of employment. At Thistley Hough Academy, we provide a foundation for understanding the world, the ability to reason mathematically, an appreciation of the beauty and power of mathematics, and a sense of enjoyment and curiosity about the subject.

English

Students at Thistley Hough Academy study both English Language and Literature in following the AQA GCSE specifications.

The study of English Language prepares students to write analytically and in detail; develop critical reading skills; hone the skill of structuring a cohesive argument and become perceptive and sensitive communicators who are able to read and write with a high degree of technical accuracy.

English Literature develops students’ knowledge and skills in reading, writing and critical thinking.  It provides students with opportunities to read a range of texts in the genres of prose, poetry and drama.  Students are assessed on their ability to analyse and compare literary texts, explore ambiguity and read a range of different forms and genres by British writers.

Science

All students at Thistley Hough Academy study Biology, Chemistry and Physics in their Science lessons. As Science teachers, we aspire to fulfil our vision of “empowering students with the skills, curiosity and resilience for 21st Century life in our community.”

We strongly believe that the Science curriculum is more important than ever to develop young people for work in the near future, that will be defined by human interaction with technology and science.

We will achieve this through the use of both practical and theoretical lessons. The practical lessons will develop the pupil’s ability to explore the world around them, develop questions they may have about natural phenomena and design experiments to test their theories.

Theoretical lessons generally concentrate understanding on scientific concepts to underpin the practical lessons and the history of Scientific developments.

Art

The Art and Design Programme combines a conceptual framework with subject specific practical skills. As well as underpinning the teaching and learning of Art and Design, the Key Concepts, which drive the programme, explore the value and impact of Pattern, Structure, Meaning, Human Interaction, Performance and Practice.

Art and Design offers opportunities for students to develop their creativity, imagination and problem solving skills through visual, tactile and formal elements. Students develop techniques through experimenting with a wide range of media in response to the disciplines of Art, whilst developing practical, technical and critical skills, communicating their ideas, feelings and meanings in response to the work of artists and designers.

Geography

At Thistley Hough Academy, our students will understand what it is to be a Geographer. Students will have a curiosity in finding out about the world and its people. They will have developed a passion and commitment to the subject. Our students will have developed an excellent knowledge of where places are and what they are like. They will have an understanding of the ways in which places are interdependent and interconnected, and how human and physical environments are interrelated. Pupils will develop an understanding of the issues facing a diverse range of places and people now and in the future, including how we can become more sustainable to help support our ever changing world.

Our pupils will have an extensive core of geographical knowledge and vocabulary, and will be able to communicate this, in a variety of ways, routinely. They will have good spatial awareness, and be able to use a wide range of maps effectively to investigate places. They will be able to carry out increasingly complex, independent geographical enquiry, ask their own relevant questions, make sense of geographical data, think critically about different views and justify their own view in reaching conclusions.

History

History at Thistley Hough Academy, encourages students to think critically about a wide variety of historical questions and to develop a broad range of historical knowledge.

In years 7, 8 and 9 students study a range of topics that will provide a solid background for GCSE study.

History plays a key role in developing our students into confident, successful adults. History requires students to develop an enquiring, critical mind especially in response to causation and consequence in regard to historical events. History as a discipline is highly regarded within the academic field and workplace.

Modern Foreign Languages

At Thistley Hough Academy, our aim is to equip all learners of MFL with a strong foundation across the four skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking. With a good understanding of the basic grammar and structures of the language, together with a secure basic vocabulary for dealing with a variety of known and unknown contexts, learners are able to move on to the next stage of language study with increasing confidence and proficiency. Through the study of foreign languages, we endeavour to embed cultural appreciation of the people and countries where French and Spanish are spoken. Our five year programme of study aims to maximise the progress and success of every student, irrespective of their starting point in foreign language learning.

Physical Education

The primary purpose of Physical Education at Thistley Hough Academy is to develop in young people an understanding of the positive impact an active lifestyle will have on their lives. The developmentally appropriate curriculum also provides a unique learning environment where affective, psychomotor and cognitive skills can be developed. In addition, good health practices, teamwork, sportsmanship, self-control, communication, resilience, and the opportunity for positive social interaction with peers are encouraged. Using leadership opportunities, students will be able to further build on these skills and characteristics as well as improving confidence. Research clearly shows that the active, healthy child is more likely to be academically motivated and establish habits of behaviour that will promote lives that are models of wellness.

Relgious Education

Religious Education at Thistley Hough Academy, encourages students to think critically about a wide variety of religious, ethical and philosophical questions.

RE plays a key role in developing our students into caring, confident, successful adults. This means not only striving for the highest standards of academic success for all our students and equipping them with the key skills for further learning and the world of work, but also providing them with the opportunities to formulate their own sets of values and beliefs about the world we live in.

Business

OverLearners will study in GCSE (9-1) Business: Marketing, Recruitment, Business structures, Finance, Business operations and Influences on businesses.

OCR’s GCSE (9–1) in Business is an up-to-date and engaging qualification that is relevant to the world of business today. This qualification equips learners with the skills and confidence to explore how different business situations affect business decisions. It is a well-rounded introduction to the subject. The qualification will encourage learners to make informed choices about a wide range of further learning opportunities and career pathways as well as develop life skills that enable them to become financially and commercially aware.

Learners will be able to understand the business world which they will enter after finishing school/college/university. They will be able to make informed decisions and put forward arguments to persuade others, have the knowledge to help you set up a business of your own. Business can lead on to many vocational qualifications and is a good stepping stone in A Level subjects, especially economics, accountancy and of course A Level Business.

Creative iMedia

OCR Cambridge Nationals Creative iMedia is an inclusive, vocational qualification that appeals to a wide range of learners and allows flexibility through a mix of external assessments that allow the course to be tailored to the individual. The vast majority of optional units are engaging and prepare students for their next steps. The course contents prepares pupils for working in the media industry due to it use of industry standard techniques. These units assess the practical application of creative interactive media skills while challenging all learners, including high attaining learners.

These qualifications will assess the application of creative media skills through their practical use. They will provide learners with essential knowledge, transferable skills and tools to improve their learning in other subjects with the aims of enhancing their employability when they leave education, contributing to their personal development and future economic well-being. The qualifications will encourage independence, creativity and awareness of the digital media sector.

The Cambridge Nationals in Creative iMedia will equip learners with a range of creative media skills and provide opportunities to develop, in context, desirable, transferable skills such as research, planning, and review, working with others and communicating creative concepts effectively. Through the use of these skills, learners will ultimately be creating fit-for-purpose creative media products. The Cambridge Nationals in Creative iMedia will also challenge all learners, including high attaining learners, by introducing them to demanding material and techniques; encouraging independence and creativity and providing tasks that engage with the most taxing aspects of the National Curriculum.

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Applying the principles of personal training
Fitness for sport
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Mastery Achievables

Right angled triangles

In this unit students are using their knowledge of substituting, rearranging formula and solving equations in a multi-step process to find lengths and angles in right-angled triangles. Students need to be fluent in their ability to manipulate equations and solve. Students are first exposed to Pythagoras and trigonometric functions in this topic and although they are not developed in the foundation tier to advanced trigonometry or right-angled triangles in 3D solids, they are sometimes embedded in more advances situations such as bearings, surface area/volume of a triangular prism, pyramids and cones.

Quadratic equations and graphs

This unit of work students will look in depth at quadratic equations. In this unit students will learn how to expand double brackets, plot quadratic graphs, find solutions to quadratics graphically and solve by factorising. Students will use prior knowledge of solving one step equations, solve two step equations, solving three step equations, expanding single brackets, expanding double brackets, factorising and using a table of values.

Perimeter, area and volume

Through this unit of work, students will consolidate their knowledge of calculating perimeter and area of squares and rectangles and converting between units of measure. They will discover the formulae needed to calculate the area and circumference of circles and will be able to apply this to calculating arc length, perimeter and area of sectors of circles. Students will develop their understanding of volume and surface area of 3D shapes and the formulae needed to calculate these.

Fractions, indices and standard form

In this unit pupils look at fractions, indices and standard form. This consolidates prior learning and further extends pupils knowledge by exposing pupils to fractional and negative powers.  This unit allows pupils to progress on to more complex algebra including binomial expressions.

Probability

In this unit pupils will work on calculating probability and using different diagrams to support this including sample space, frequency tree, Venn diagrams and tree diagrams. This unit consolidates previous work on using fractions, decimals and percentages in a different context.  Pupils then can progress onto set notation and set theory as well as conditional probability.

Congruence, similarity and vectors

This unit draws on previous knowledge to develop new skills and understanding. It takes many other mathematical elements which students are then recapping and combines these to create more advances geometrical reasoning and problem solving. Students acquire more geometric facts and notations such as identifying congruent triangles and vectors. It is important that students have a solid understanding of previous geometric properties in order to access the content within this unit.

Mastery Achievables

More algebra

In this unit pupils consolidate their learning on factorising expressions and solving equations in order to solve simultaneous equations graphically and algebraically. Students will discover that simultaneous equations have two variables and so need two equations to solve. This unit also builds upon drawing and interpreting graphs of quadratic functions and progresses into drawing and interpreting graphs of cubic functions.

Mastery Achievables

Revision and exam preparation.

Mastery Achievables

LITERATURE: Poetry anthology, ‘Power and Conflict’

Both English Language and English Literature require students to access a wide range of texts, engaging with writers’ intentions and viewpoints; the use of language devices, structural choices and the context within which a text is written. From this, students need to formulate their own view points and respond to the texts in a critical way. This unit enables students to hone these skills through the analysis of 15 independent poems with a singular theme of Power and Conflict.

The poems studied form the AQA ‘Power and Conflict’ cluster.  These poems span centuries and continents making them diverse and historically significant.  They reflect the authors’ personal, political and social beliefs. Students will discuss, analyse and critique the ideas and concepts presented in the poems commenting on language, form and structure. Students will consider how the themes of Power and Conflict apply to individual poems but also how they collectively represent shades of meaning within these concepts.

The expectation in the exam is that students will compare how two poems present a given theme or concept looking at language, form and structure. Students need to understand how these concepts are presented and express their ideas in a clear and evaluative manner.

The skills learnt in this unit will further develop those learnt in earlier units, through close analysis of language, authorial intent, form and structure.

LITERATURE: Revision

Revision will be designed on an individual and class basis.  The information used to inform the class teacher’s revision choices will be based on information and data collected from student exams which are sat in the summer of Year 10.

Class teaching will centre on refining areas of weakness regarding subject skills, curriculum content and knowledge retention. Pinpointing areas of weakness and addressing them ahead of the formal public examinations.

Students will also complete a mock exam, sitting all components on both Literature papers.

LANGUAGE: Revision

Revision will be based on an individual and class basis.   The information used to inform the class teacher’s revision choices will be based on information and data collected from student exams which are sat in the summer of Year 10.

Class teaching will centre on refining areas of weakness regarding subject skills, curriculum content and knowledge retention. Pinpointing areas of weakness and addressing them ahead of the formal public examinations.

Students will also complete a mock exam, sitting all components on both Language papers.

Mastery Achievables

LITERATURE: Revision

Revision will be based on an individual and class basis.  The information used to inform the class teacher’s judgement will be based on information and data collated following the student’s exams in the Autumn term of Year 11.

Students will also complete a mock exam, sitting all components in both Literature papers.

LANGUAGE: Revision

Revision will be based on an individual and class basis.  The information used to inform the class teacher’s judgement will be based on information and data collated following the student’s exams in the Autumn term of Year 11.

Students will also complete a mock exam, sitting all components in both Language papers.

Mastery Achievables

Biology: Inheritance, Variation and Evolution

In this chapter students will build on their work of genes from year 7 and 8 to study the molecule of DNA in greater detail. Additionally, students will discover how mutations affect physical characteristics and study genetic disease. In the later stages of the unit students will explore evolution and link their knowledge of this principle to extinction of species and antibiotic resistant bacteria.

Chemistry: Chemical Analysis

This chapter will bring together the students’ knowledge gained throughout their study of chemistry to enable them to determine unknown chemicals from various reactions and tests. This may include chemical tests for gases or using a series of reactions to determine the composition of ions within ionic compounds.

Physics: Magnetism and Electromagnetism & Space Physics

This topic will bring together the students understanding of many physics concepts and apply them to real world uses. This will include using magnetic fields to study how electric motors work and how electricity is generated. Some students will also study how electromagnets are used in several everyday appliance and how transformers are used to assist in electrical power distribution. As part of their work on space physics, students will study the life cycle of stars and the how satellites orbit around the Earth.

Mastery Achievables

By term 2 of year 11, all of the content needed for students to sit their GCSE exams will have been taught. In this term we will use data from previous assessments to determine priorities for revision sessions leading up to the terminal exams.

Mastery Achievables

By term 3 of year 11, all of the content needed for students to sit their GCSE exams will have been taught. In this term we will use data from previous assessments to determine priorities for revision sessions leading up to the terminal exams.

Mastery Achievables

Realisation of the final piece.

Realisation of the final piece and critical evaluation.

Mastery Achievables

Exam – Observational drawing form selected secondary sources and artist research.

Design development, experimentation. Final exam and realisation.

Mastery Achievables

How is the urban world becoming more sustainable?

By the end of this unit students will have investigated the sustainable city of Freiburg, Germany and be able to identify its features of sustainable urban living including its resource management, traffic management strategies and transport networks. They will be able to discuss how its features enable it to be sustainable and what the social, economic and environmental benefits are to both the local populace and Germany as a whole.

How can we reduce the development gap?

At the end of this unit, students will be have further built upon their prior knowledge of what development is and the development gap. They will be able to identify the global variations in economic development and quality of life using a range of economic and social measures. They will explore new development indicators such as the Human Development Index and assess its effectiveness. They will have further developed their awareness of the development gap and explored the reasons for its growth; whilst being able to classify these reasons as either human and physical causes. Finally students will understand the variety of strategies used to reduce the development gap including a case study of tourism in Jamaica.

How has Nigeria become a Newly Emerging Economy?

Students will be able apply their prior knowledge of the role of TNCS, industrial development and the key economic sectors to the NEE of Nigeria, to show Nigeria’s relationships with the wider world. They will also be able to know the impact of aid and economic development on both the environment and the quality of life in Nigeria.

Mastery Achievables

How is the UK economy changing?

To identify and explain changes to the UK’s economy through deindustrialisation, globalisation and government policies. To understand the UK’s, move to a post-industrial economy through science and business parks, and social and economic changes in rural economies, to the development of transport in the UK and the issues of the north-south divide. To know the UK’s place within the wider world.

How do we manage resources within the UK?

By the end of this unit students will know that food, water and energy are fundamental to human development and that global inequalities exist in the supply and consumption of these resources. They will also understand that the changing demand and provision of resources in the UK creates both opportunities and challenges and how the UK has resolved these challenges through its policies and decisions in recent years.

How is Energy managed?

Students will be aware that the demand for energy resources is rising globally but supply can be insecure, which may lead to conflict. They will be able to identify different strategies that can be used to increase energy supply, whilst being able to identify and explain the increasing use of renewable resources and the move towards a sustainable resource future, using examples of Chambamontera and Malmo, Sweden.

Mastery Achievables

Pre-release Materials: (Geographical Issues Evaluation)

Students will explore a particular geographical issue(s) derived from the specification using secondary sources; in which they will be able to apply their geographical understanding and knowledge, and demonstrate their geographical skills to this said issue. A resource booklet will be made available by the exam board twelve weeks before the date of the exam so that students can work through the resources, enabling them to become familiar with the materials.

Mastery Achievables

Norman England 1066-c1100 (2021-22 only)

The Norman England unit is the final component for the AQA GCSE examination. It makes up 50% of Paper 2 with Migration, Power and People making up the remaining part of Paper 2. Migration Power and People was studied in Year 10.

This unit was an extraordinary period of British history as it saw the end of the Anglo-Saxon dynasties and the imposition of a Norman one. Students will study the reasoning behind the problems of 1066 and perhaps the most famous battle in English history at Hastings. After the conquest, Norman rulers imposed a new social structure and students will understand the impact it had on all sections of life. Students will also have the opportunity to study a historical environment and understand its purpose and how it changed under Norman rule. For this year, students will study the White Tower in London as part of this study. Students will develop skills such as interpretation and analysis.

This study is important as many of the changes imposed by the Norman rulers are still evident today such as language, law, taxation, architecture and religion.

Mastery Achievables

Preparation for Summer Examinations

During this term, students will be revisiting sections of the course that has been highlighted as an area for improvement. Lesson content and skills will be created on results from Pre-Public Examinations that students will sit at the end of the Autumn term. Students will also have an opportunity to sit a further exam in the Spring term and lessons will be adapted again to correspond to the student’s area for improvement. Students will be preparing for their examination in the summer.

Mastery Achievables

Preparation for Summer Examinations

During this term, students will be revisiting sections of the course that has been highlighted as an area for improvement. Lesson content and skills will be created on results from Pre-Public Examinations that students will sit at the end of the Autumn term. Students will also have an opportunity to sit a further exam in the Spring term and lessons will be adapted again to correspond to the student’s area for improvement. Students will be preparing for their examination in the summer.

Mastery Achievables

Students begin Year 11 describing what they like to do in their holidays and how they travel. They give accounts of past holidays and talk about holidays they would like to go on in the future.

Mastery Achievables

In the spring term, students go on to describe school life, including rules and pressures, and express detailed opinions about school subjects and extra-curricular activities. They go on to talk about post-16 plans, learn about jobs and discuss career aspirations.

Mastery Achievables

A – design a personal fitness training programme
B – know about the musculoskeletal system and cardiorespiratory system and the effects on the body during fitness training
C – Implement a self-designed personal fitness training programme to achieve own goals and objectives
D – review a personal fitness training programme.

 

  • Understand how to design a training programme safely
  • Understanding different body systems
  • Implement fitness training programme
  • Review training programme
Mastery Achievables

A – know about the components of fitness and the principles of training
B – explore different fitness training methods
C – investigate fitness testing to determine fitness levels.

 

  • Components of fitness (skill and physical)
  • Exercise intensities
  • Principles of training
  • Recommendation of fitness testing methods
  • Methods of training
Mastery Achievables

Half term one- Theme E; Crime and punishment.

The crime and punishment topic continues student’s development further showing the influence of religion on issues facing humans today. Additionally, we delve deeper into the influence of these beliefs while focussing on controversial topics and the contrasting views within contemporary Britain towards these. Students should study religious teachings, and religious, philosophical and ethical arguments, relating to crime and punishment. This unit will give students a firm understanding of crime and its implications. This is a topic area that will feature on paper 2 and will account for 1/8 of their overall GCSE grade.

Half term two – Theme D peace and conflict.

Theme D Peace and conflict continues the learning journey in this phase of thematic studies and also build in topic areas which are vital in sparking difficult debates and allowing students discuss challenging issues with a continuing focus on British values. We chose this unit for study over others because it can be used real life current scenarios to promote high level thinking skills. Additionally, the strong focus on British values means it also builds well on previous topics.

Mastery Achievables

Intervention and excellence.

Students will be rigorously assessed in preparation for their GCSE Religious Studies examinations. This term will allow for self and teacher assessment to identify any gaps in crucial knowledge and reteach accordingly. Additionally, students will engage in debates on all aspect of the GCSE course of study to hone their skills and draw crucial links between topic areas.

Mastery Achievables

Intervention and excellence.

Students will be rigorously assessed in preparation for their GCSE Religious Studies examinations. This term will allow for self and teacher assessment to identify any gaps in crucial knowledge and reteach accordingly. Additionally, students will engage in debates on all aspect of the GCSE course of study to hone their skills and draw crucial links between topic areas.

Mastery Achievables

Core Course Topics:

  • Business 1(01)
  • Business activity
  • Marketing
  • People

This component introduces learners to business concepts and issues concerning the activities of a business. It explores the purpose and role of a business from first spotting an enterprising opportunity through to the growth of an established business. It takes a closer look at the role of marketing and human resources.

There are three sections covering content – section 1: business activity, section 2: marketing and section 3: people. Content from these three sections will be assessed in component 01. Throughout this component learners will need to consider how different contexts affect business decisions.

This component will support spotting an opportunity, developing an idea for a business, satisfying the needs of customers, identifying and understanding customer needs, Interpretation of market data, importance of effective communication, ways of communicating in a business context, CV, application form, letter of application, interviews, tests, group activities, references.

Mastery Achievables

Core Course Topics:

  • Business 2 (02)
  • Operations
  • Finance
  • Influences on Business

(Note: The interdependent nature of business is taught throughout the curriculum)

This component takes a closer look at the role of operations and finance and introduces learners to external influences on business. It explores the importance of these influences and how businesses change in response to them. Finally, learners will use content from both component 01 and component 02 to make connections between different elements of the subject.
There are four sections covering content – section 4: operations, section 5: finance, section 6: influences on business and section 7: the interdependent nature of business. Content from all these sections will be assessed in component 02. Learners will also be required to draw on content from Business 1: business activity, marketing and human resources to answer synoptic questions in section B of the component 02 examination. Throughout this component learners will need to consider how different contexts affect business decisions.

This component will help learners understand how to gain and retain customers , understand e-commerce to gain and retain customers and the use of financial information in measuring and understanding business performance and decision making.

Mastery Achievables

Core Course Topics:

  • Revision/Recap Business 1 and Business 2
  • Examination

Learners introduced to a range of revision techniques and examination practice questions. Learners asked to ‘Think about it’. These features are a prompt for learners to pause their reading revision. This will help to develop learners to develop their understanding by considering what would happen in a given situation. Learners asked to ‘Check their understanding’. These activities will help learners to each topic in an interactive way. Learners will asked to ‘Test themselves’. These short, knowledge-based questions provide the first step in testing their learning.

Learners provided with ‘Exam tips’. These expert tips throughout the module and help learners to polish their exam technique in order to maximise marks in the exam. Learners provided with ‘Exam practice’. Practice exam questions provided for each topic. This will help learners to consolidate their revision and practise exam skills. Learners provided with ‘key words’. These are clear, concise definitions of essential key terms throughout the module.

Mastery Achievables

Core Course Topics:

  • Option Unit 2 LO1 LO2 Creating interactive multimedia products
  • Option Unit 2 LO3 LO4 Creating interactive multimedia products

This unit builds on units R081 and R082 and learners will be able to apply the skills, knowledge and understanding gained in those units.

Interactive multimedia products are used widely in everyday life and the creative and digital media sector. They are used in computer games, mobile phone applications, presentations and many other areas.

This unit will enable learners to understand the basics of interactive multimedia products for the creative and digital media sector. They will learn where and why interactive multimedia is used and what features are needed for a given purpose. It will enable them to interpret a client brief, and to use time frames, deadlines and preparation techniques as part of the planning and creation process when creating an interactive multimedia product.

On completion of this unit, learners will understand the purpose and properties of interactive multimedia products, be able to plan and create an interactive multimedia product to a client’s requirements and review it, identifying areas for improvement.

Mastery Achievables

Core Course Topics:

  • Revision/Recap My Revision Notes Pre-production skills and Creating digital graphics
  • Examination

Learners introduced to a range of revision techniques and examination practice questions. Learners asked to ‘Think about it’. These features are a prompt for learners to pause their reading revision. This will help to develop learners to develop their understanding by considering what would happen in a given situation. Learners asked to ‘Check their understanding’. These activities will help learners to each topic in an interactive way. Learners will asked to ‘Test themselves’. These short, knowledge-based questions provide the first step in testing their learning.

Learners provided with ‘Exam tips’. These expert tips throughout the module and help learners to polish their exam technique in order to maximise marks in the exam. Learners provided with ‘Exam practice’. Practice exam questions provided for each topic. This will help learners to consolidate their revision and practise exam skills. Learners provided with ‘key words’. These are clear, concise definitions of essential key terms throughout the module.

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